The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya

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The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya Empty The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya

Post  Admin on Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:00 am

The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:13 am

We are in the process of putting together a booklet about the 7
Principles for Success taught by the Buddha to help better explain to
people in various ways about the importance of the 7 Principles for
Success and why they need them to stop such and such types of decline.
We have also started a topic in the Buddhist images section.

This type of work has been marked as a high priority with our service
and our members may consider additonal ways of explaining to people
about the importance of these and various ways of implementation of
these practices in society.

Section from beginning of Long Discourse 16 published by Wisdom
Publications Full Translation Long Discourses of the Buddha previously
published as paperback titled Thus Have I Heard and the same section
which may also be found in the Section of the 7s Vajjian Chapter,
Numerical Discourses of the Buddha, full translation published by Pali
Text Society with title, The Book of the Gradual Sayings



4. At that time the Venerable Ananda [4] was standing behind the
Blessed One, fanning him, and the Blessed One addressed the Venerable
Ananda thus: "What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis have frequent
gatherings, and are their meetings well attended?"

"I have heard, Lord, that this is so."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis assemble and disperse
peacefully and attend to their affairs in concord?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis neither enact new decrees
nor abolish existing ones, but proceed in accordance with their
ancient constitutions?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis show respect, honor,
esteem, and veneration towards their elders and think it worthwhile to
listen to them?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis refrain from abducting
women and maidens of good families and from detaining them?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they refrain from doing so."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis show respect, honor,
esteem, and veneration towards their shrines, both those within the
city and those outside it, and do not deprive them of the due
offerings as given and made to them formerly?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do venerate their shrines, and that
they do not deprive them of their offerings."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis duly protect and guard the
arahats, so that those who have not come to the realm yet might do so,
and those who have already come might live there in peace?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline."

5. And the Blessed One addressed the brahman Vassakara in these words:
"Once, brahman, I dwelt at Vesali, at the Sarandada shrine, and there
it was that I taught the Vajjis these seven conditions leading to (a
nation's) welfare. [5] So long, brahman, as these endure among the
Vajjis, and the Vajjis are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline."
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:27 am

Tithing has continued to be popular and influencial practice in the
world dating back in the Christian Religion to the Book of Daniel and
beyond.

These concerns continue to be relevant today and it has been suggested
that we capitalize on people's vested interest in preventing decline
in our booklet, including with topics such as Operation Mana Conquers
the Nazis.

If people were facing and/or concerned about a Nazi like situation and
they knew how excellent and relevant our principles are to the issue,
it could help our readership.

Some books or booklets have a book description included on the cover
and we may like to include some angle on tithing with our description
to help people understand that this is the topic they would be looking
for.

We have from time to time fielded questions about how Buddhist
Principles could be used to better respond or proactively prevent such
and such historical concerns.

Since the Nazis and WWII are a big historical concern including with
America and Europe we have responded to a number.

During our study about the Netherlands Water Restraining Systems we
also happened to read about how the delivery of food to Europe helped
the people there who were being neglected by the Nazis.

Of course this fits in with maintaining the shrines at home and
abroad(Principle 6) not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made
and given before and are general Buddhist practice of generosity.(Cago
as referred to in the Third Noble Truth which continues to be of
inspiration today as it was in the time of Lord Buddha Vipassi.
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:32 am

We are a world leader in knowing about the spiritual roots about the
decline of the weather in the United States in the past 10 years and
we can take advantage of this with our booklet that we are the
knowledge source about the problem, the cause of the problem, the
improvement about the decline, and the way to get the improvement
about the decline.


We have been getting some extreme weather in the United States in the
past 10 years.

We know why that is and we founded the Principle 7 Subforum with the
Weather and Relief Subforum to help arouse peoples mindfulness about
this concerning issue.

Now we have started to see more of a similar concern in Asia for the
same reason and we are called upon to keep developing more and more
ways of arousing people's mindfulness about the issue since we know
why.

Since we have superior knowledge as to the issue let us also take a
"bigger piece of the pie" with regards to Principle 7 services since
we are the ones who know best about the reason for the increase in the
weather concerns and let us benefit from our experience serving in
America to more quickly address the issue in Asia prior to it becoming
as extreme as the situation was in the United States then.
Panga7

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Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 12:18 pm

Sainthood Forum has demonstrated the relevant World Foresight knowing
about the spiritual roots of the Weather Problems in the United States
and providing online advisement to Asia about the importance of
Classical Buddhist Practice in the tradition of Samma Sambuddha Gotama
with anticipation of the same concerns.

Invest in the future with the 7 Buddhist Principles for Success and
the unsurpassed Teaching of Buddha Gotama. Buddha Gotama has attained
the deathless and we have demonstrated the advantage of our
understanding of his teaching.
Panga7

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Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:50 am

Questions we have been getting about the 7 Principles for Success.

including

How can we develope the 7 Principles for Success to help about weather concerns?

How can we provide proper guard ward and protection according to the
dhamma for Arahants so that such Arahants may come in the future to
abide there and those already there may abide in comfort if we are not
sure whether someone is an Arahant or not?
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:00 pm

The duties of a Dharmaraja from Long Discourse # 26

A Dharmaraja provides proper guard, ward and protection according to
the dhamma for his Khattiya vassals attending on him, for Brahmins and
householders, town and country folk(those staying in urban areas and
those staying in rural or forest areas), ascetics and Brahmins, beast
and bird. He allows no evil to succeed in the country. He gives
property to the needy. From time to time he goes to wise ascetics and
Brahmins, each one calming himself, each one taming himself and asks
questions such as: What is the wholesome? What is the unwholesome?
What is blameworthy? What is blameless? What course should be
followed? What course should not be followed? What if I do it will
lead to my happiness for a long time? What if I do it will lead to my
suffering for a long time?

These are the duties of a Dharmaraja.


Since Principle 6 for preventing decline is maintaining the shrines at
home and abroad not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made and
given before and one can see how this fits in with the giving property
to the needy duty of a Dharmaraja one can be diligient about monks and
nuns, male and female samaneras even if one is not sure about who is
an Arahant and who has not attained Arahantship yet.
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:10 pm

Panga7 wrote:
The duties of a Dharmaraja from Long Discourse # 26

A Dharmaraja provides proper guard, ward and protection according to
the dhamma for his Khattiya vassals attending on him, for Brahmins and
householders, town and country folk(those staying in urban areas and
those staying in rural or forest areas), ascetics and Brahmins, beast
and bird. He allows no evil to succeed in the country. He gives
property to the needy. From time to time he goes to wise ascetics and
Brahmins, each one calming himself, each one taming himself and asks
questions such as: What is the wholesome? What is the unwholesome?
What is blameworthy? What is blameless? What course should be
followed? What course should not be followed? What if I do it will
lead to my happiness for a long time? What if I do it will lead to my
suffering for a long time?

These are the duties of a Dharmaraja.


Since Principle 6 for preventing decline is maintaining the shrines at
home and abroad not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made and
given before and one can see how this fits in with the giving property
to the needy duty of a Dharmaraja one can be diligient about monks and
nuns, male and female samaneras even if one is not sure about who is
an Arahant and who has not attained Arahantship yet.


What happened in the United States in the past some 10 years plus now
is some people were very negligient and then very naughty to an
Arahant monk and then there were many more weather type disasters and
these types of things.

We have seen the same types of concerns in Asia because of the same
reason, but we are hoping because of Asia's traditional respect for
Buddhism that will enable us to warn them. Furthermore warning about
the public endangerment that such naughty behavior would cause in
general may help us to place stopping such naughty behavior and such
slander, perjury, and public endangerment that would attempt to
accompany such naughty behavior.

So the same basic principles apply and in the case of slander,
perjury, and public endangerment we are obliged to scrutinize the
facts furthermore to save lives, and not act wrongly in response to
false allegations or claims, and not to allow corrupt people to
oppress and harass Arahant monastics while attempting to deliberately
deceive the public about the truth.

So the fact finding procedures should be pressed to hire and otappi
the naughty corrupt people so that they will be afraid to endanger the
public, and don't let them deprive people of liberty without due
process, nor under false claims that due process was followed when in
fact what they are doing is ridiculous nonsense and deliberate
criminal conspiracy.
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:32 pm

Another thing we have gotten a very positive and interested response
from in general is cago, generosity with the third Noble Truth.

We have applied this including with our philanthropy work and it makes
a great deal of sense to us and apparently to many of our followers
because we have gotten a big response.

So cago is certainly very relevant to the 7 Principles for Success and
therefore another angle for inclusion with our booklet.

Buddha has referred to his knowledge of the 12 ways, the 3 modes of
penetration to the 4 Noble Truths being completely purified and we can
use this to help clarify how the Buddhist practise in general helps to
fulfill the factors of the 7 factors of enlightenment.
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:57 pm

Buddha also includes with his talk to the monks then in Section 1 from
Long Discourse #16, a number of principles for the monks to prevent
decline.

Our booklet about the Principles for preventing decline may be an
appropriate context to also consider these things taught to the monks.

Additionally Buddha includes 6 Memorable Qualities which are revelant
to our considerations with the booklet and our including here with the
quote from LD#16.


6. Then, soon after Vassakara's departure, the Blessed One addressed
the Venerable Ananda thus: "Go now, Ananda, and assemble in the hall
of audience as many bhikkhus as live around Rajagaha."

"Very well, Lord." And the Venerable Ananda did as he was requested
and informed the Blessed One: "The community of bhikkhus is assembled,
Lord. Now let the Blessed One do as he wishes."

Thereupon the Blessed One rose from his seat, went up to the hall of
audience, took his appointed seat there, and addressed the bhikkhus
thus: "Seven conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they assemble frequently and in large numbers;
meet and disperse peacefully and attend to the affairs of the Sangha
in concord; so long as they appoint no new rules, and do not abolish
the existing ones, but proceed in accordance with the code of training
(Vinaya) laid down; so long as they show respect, honor, esteem, and
veneration towards the elder bhikkhus, those of long standing, long
gone forth, the fathers and leaders of the Sangha, and think it
worthwhile to listen to them; so long as they do not come under the
power of the craving that leads to fresh becoming; so long as they
cherish the forest depths for their dwellings; so long as they
establish themselves in mindfulness, so that virtuous brethren of the
Order who have not come yet might do so, and those already come might
live in peace; so long, bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to
welfare endure among the bhikkhus and the bhikkhus are known for it,
their growth is to be expected, not their decline.

7. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they do not delight in, are not pleased with, and
are not fond of activities, talk, sleep, and company; so long as they
do not harbor, do not come under the spell of evil desires; have no
bad friends, associates, or companions; and so long as they do not
stop halfway on account of some trifling achievement. So long,
bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among
the bhikkhus and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Seven Good Qualities [6]

8. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they shall have faith, so long as they have moral
shame and fear of misconduct, are proficient in learning, resolute,
mindful, and wise. So long, bhikkhus, as these seven conditions
leading to welfare endure among the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are
known for it, their growth is to be expected, not their decline.
Seven Factors of Enlightenment [7]

9. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they cultivate the seven factors of
enlightenment, that is: mindfulness, investigation into phenomena,
energy, bliss, tranquillity, concentration, and equanimity. So long,
bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among
the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Seven Perceptions

10. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they cultivate the perception of impermanence, of
egolessness, of (the body's) impurity, of (the body's) wretchedness,
of relinquishment, of dispassion, and of cessation. So long, bhikkhus,
as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among the
bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Six Conditions to be Remembered [8]

11. "Six further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they attend on each other with loving-kindness in
deed, word, and thought, both openly and in private; so long as in
respect of what they receive as due offerings, even the contents of
their alms bowls, they do not make use of them without sharing them
with virtuous members of the community; so long as, in company with
their brethren, they train themselves, openly and in private, in the
rules of conduct, which are complete and perfect, spotless and pure,
liberating, praised by the wise, uninfluenced (by mundane concerns),
and favorable to concentration of mind; and in company with their
brethren, preserve, openly and in private, the insight that is noble
and liberating, and leads one who acts upon it to the utter
destruction of suffering. So long, bhikkhus, as these six conditions
leading to welfare endure among the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are
known for it, their growth is to be expected, not their decline.
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Mon Dec 05, 2011 1:23 pm

More selections from Vajjian Vagga, Vajjian Chapter, from Sattaka
Nipata, Section of the 7's, Anguttara Nikaya, Numerical Discourses of
the Buddha, also translated by Pali Text Society in full with title
Gradual Sayings.

7:26 (Pali Text numbering system)

Monks, these 7 things lead to decline of a monk when training. What 7?

Delight in action("action"), delight in talk, delight in sleeping,
delight in company, unguardedness of the sense-doors, no moderation in
eating, and when there is business of the Order(some task that should
be done for the Sangha) a monk undergoing the training does not
reflect, "There are in the Order elders of experience, long gone
forth, of long standing, the fathers and leaders of the Sangha. They
will be known for that, but makes an effort on his own account.

Verily monks, these are the 7...(and the opposite holds for principle
for preventing decline of a monk in training.)

7:27 Decline

These 7 things lead to a lay disciple's decline. What 7?

He fails to see the monks, neglects to hear Sadhamma, trains not in
more virtue(adhisila), puts little trust in elder monks(monks worthy
of trust), novice, or middle standing, with critical mind seeking
faults, hears Dhamma, seeks a gift worthy outside the Order and their
first serves.

Verily monks, these 7 things lead to a lay-disciple's decline.(And the
opposite holds for 7 principles of non-decline)

Who fails to see the man in whom the self is made become, nor Ariyan
Dhamma hears,
Nor in more virtue trains, whose trust in monks
Groweth not more and more, who fain would listen
With carping mind to Saddhama, who seeks
Outside some gift worthy and even there
As lay-disciple his first service doing
These 7 well taught things that causes decline
Who practices in Saddhamma declines.

Who never fails to see self cultured men,
Hears Ariyan Dhamma, in more virtue(adhisila) trains,
Whose trust in monks grows ever more and more
Who listens not to Saddhamma carpingly,
Nor seeks outside one gift worthy, but those
Within as lay disciple firstly serves;
These 7 taught things that never cause decline,
Who follows in Saddhamma ne'r(does not) decline.

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The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya Empty Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya

Post  Admin on Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:02 am

Part Five: At Kusinara
Last Place of Rest

1. Then the Blessed One addressed the Venerable Ananda, saying:
"Come, Ananda, let us cross to the farther bank of the Hiraññavati,
and go to the Mallas' Sala Grove, in the vicinity of Kusinara."

"So be it, Lord."

2. And the Blessed One, together with a large company of bhikkhus,
went to the further bank of the river Hiraññavati, to the Sala Grove
of the Mallas, in the vicinity of Kusinara. And there he spoke to the
Venerable Ananda, saying:

3. "Please, Ananda, prepare for me a couch between the twin sala
trees, with the head to the north. I am weary, Ananda, and want to lie
down."[41]

"So be it, Lord." And the Venerable Ananda did as the Blessed One
asked him to do.

Then the Blessed One lay down on his right side, in the lion's
posture, resting one foot upon the other, and so disposed himself,
mindfully and clearly comprehending.

4. At that time the twin sala trees broke out in full bloom,
though it was not the season of flowering. And the blossoms rained
upon the body of the Tathagata and dropped and scattered and were
strewn upon it in worship of the Tathagata. And celestial mandarava
flowers and heavenly sandalwood powder from the sky rained down upon
the body of the Tathagata, and dropped and scattered and were strewn
upon it in worship of the Tathagata. And the sound of heavenly voices
and heavenly instruments made music in the air out of reverence for
the Tathagata.

5. And the Blessed One spoke to the Venerable Ananda, saying:
"Ananda, the twin sala trees are in full bloom, though it is not the
season of flowering. And the blossoms rain upon the body of the
Tathagata and drop and scatter and are strewn upon it in worship of
the Tathagata. And celestial coral flowers and heavenly sandalwood
powder from the sky rain down upon the body of the Tathagata, and drop
and scatter and are strewn upon it in worship of the Tathagata. And
the sound of heavenly voices and heavenly instruments makes music in
the air out of reverence for the Tathagata.

6. "Yet it is not thus, Ananda, that the Tathagata is respected,
venerated, esteemed, worshipped, and honored in the highest degree.
But, Ananda, whatever bhikkhu or bhikkhuni, layman or laywoman, abides
by the Dhamma, lives uprightly in the Dhamma, walks in the way of the
Dhamma, it is by such a one that the Tathagata is respected,
venerated, esteemed, worshipped, and honored in the highest degree.
Therefore, Ananda, thus should you train yourselves: 'We shall abide
by the Dhamma, live uprightly in the Dhamma, walk in the way of the
Dhamma.'"
The Grief of the Gods

7. At that time the Venerable Upavana was standing before the
Blessed One, fanning him. And the Blessed One rebuked him, saying:
"Move aside, bhikkhu, do not stand in front of me."

8. And to the Venerable Ananda came the thought: "This Venerable
Upavana has been in attendance on the Blessed One for a long time,
closely associating with him and serving him. Yet now, right at the
end, the Blessed One rebukes him. What now could be the reason, what
the cause for the Blessed One to rebuke the Venerable Upavana, saying:
'Move aside, bhikkhu, do not stand in front of me'?"

9-10. And the Venerable Ananda told his thought to the Blessed
One. The Blessed One said: "Throughout the tenfold world-system,
Ananda, there are hardly any of the deities that have not gathered
together to look upon the Tathagata. For a distance of twelve yojanas
around the Sala Grove of the Mallas in the vicinity of Kusinara there
is not a spot that could be pricked with the tip of a hair that is not
filled with powerful deities. And these deities, Ananda, are
complaining: 'From afar have we come to look upon the Tathagata. For
rare in the world is the arising of Tathagatas, Arahants, Fully
Enlightened Ones. And this day, in the last watch of the night, the
Tathagata's Parinibbana will come about. But this bhikkhu of great
powers has placed himself right in front of the Blessed One,
concealing him, so that now, at the very end, we are prevented from
looking upon him.' Thus, Ananda, the deities complain."

11. "Of what kind of deities, Lord, is the Blessed One aware?"

12-13. "There are deities, Ananda, in space and on earth, who are
earthly-minded; with dishevelled hair they weep, with uplifted arms
they weep; flinging themselves on the ground, they roll from side to
side, lamenting: 'Too soon has the Blessed One come to his
Parinibbana! Too soon has the Happy One come to his Parinibbana! Too
soon will the Eye of the World vanish from sight!'

14. "But those deities who are freed from passion, mindful and
comprehending, reflect in this way: 'Impermanent are all compounded
things. How could this be otherwise?'"
Ananda's Concern

15. "Formerly, Lord, on leaving their quarters after the rains,
the bhikkhus would set forth to see the Tathagata, and to us there was
the gain and benefit of receiving and associating with those very
revered bhikkhus who came to have audience with the Blessed One and to
wait upon him. But, Lord, after the Blessed One has gone, we shall no
longer have that gain and benefit."
Four Places of Pilgrimage

16. "There are four places, Ananda, that a pious person should
visit and look upon with feelings of reverence.[42] What are the four?

17. "'Here the Tathagata was born!'[43] This, Ananda, is a place
that a pious person should visit and look upon with feelings of
reverence.

18. "'Here the Tathagata became fully enlightened in unsurpassed,
supreme Enlightenment!'[44] This, Ananda, is a place that a pious
person should visit and look upon with feelings of reverence.

19. "'Here the Tathagata set rolling the unexcelled Wheel of the
Dhamma!'[45] This, Ananda, is a place that a pious person should visit
and look upon with feelings of reverence.

20. "'Here the Tathagata passed away into the state of Nibbana in
which no element of clinging remains!' This, Ananda, is a place that a
pious person should visit and look upon with feelings of reverence.

21. "These, Ananda, are the four places that a pious person should
visit and look upon with feelings of reverence. And truly there will
come to these places, Ananda, pious bhikkhus and bhikkhunis, laymen
and laywomen, reflecting: 'Here the Tathagata was born! Here the
Tathagata became fully enlightened in unsurpassed, supreme
Enlightenment! Here the Tathagata set rolling the unexcelled Wheel of
the Dhamma! Here the Tathagata passed away into the state of Nibbana
in which no element of clinging remains!'

22. "And whoever, Ananda, should die on such a pilgrimage with his
heart established in faith, at the breaking up of the body, after
death, will be reborn in a realm of heavenly happiness."

23. Then the Venerable Ananda said to the Blessed One: "How, Lord,
should we conduct ourselves towards women?"

"Do not see them, Ananda."

"But, Lord, if we do see them?"

"Do not speak, Ananda."

"But, Lord, if they should speak to us?"

"Then, Ananda, you should establish mindfulness."

24. Then the Venerable Ananda said: "How should we act, Lord,
respecting the body of the Tathagata?"

"Do not hinder yourselves, Ananda, to honor the body of the
Tathagata. Rather you should strive, Ananda, and be zealous on your
own behalf,[46] for your own good. Unflinchingly, ardently, and
resolutely you should apply yourselves to your own good. For there
are, Ananda, wise nobles, wise brahmans, and wise householders who are
devoted to the Tathagata, and it is they who will render the honor to
the body of the Tathagata."

25. Then the Venerable Ananda said: "But how, Lord, should they
act respecting the body of the Tathagata?"

"After the same manner, Ananda, as towards the body of a universal
monarch."[47]

"But how, Lord, do they act respecting the body of a universal monarch?"

26. "The body of a universal monarch, Ananda, is first wrapped
round with new linen, and then with teased cotton wool, and so it is
done up to five hundred layers of linen and five hundred of cotton
wool. When that is done, the body of the universal monarch is placed
in an iron[48] oil vessel, which is enclosed in another iron vessel, a
funeral pyre is built of all kinds of perfumed woods, and so the body
of the universal monarch is burned; and at a crossroads a stupa is
raised for the universal monarch. So it is done, Ananda, with the body
of a universal monarch. And even, Ananda, as with the body of a
universal monarch, so should it be done with the body of the
Tathagata; and at a crossroads also a stupa should be raised for the
Tathagata. And whosoever shall bring to that place garlands or incense
or sandalpaste, or pay reverence, and whose mind becomes calm there —
it will be to his well being and happiness for a long time.

27. "There are four persons, Ananda, who are worthy of a stupa.
Who are those four? A Tathagata, an Arahant, a Fully Enlightened One
is worthy of a stupa; so also is a Paccekabuddha,[49] and a disciple
of a Tathagata, and a universal monarch.

28-31. "And why, Ananda, is a Tathagata, an Arahant, a Fully
Enlightened One worthy of a stupa? Because, Ananda, at the thought:
'This is the stupa of that Blessed One, Arahant, Fully Enlightened
One!' the hearts of many people will be calmed and made happy; and so
calmed and with their minds established in faith therein, at the
breaking up of the body, after death, they will be reborn in a realm
of heavenly happiness. And so also at the thought: 'This is the stupa
of that Paccekabuddha!' or 'This is the stupa of a disciple of that
Tathagata, Arahant, Fully Enlightened One!' or 'This is the stupa of
that righteous monarch who ruled according to Dhamma!' — the hearts of
many people are calmed and made happy; and so calmed and with their
minds established in faith therein, at the breaking up of the body,
after death, they will be reborn in a realm of heavenly happiness. And
it is because of this, Ananda, that these four persons are worthy of a
stupa."
Ananda's Grief

32. Then the Venerable Ananda went into the vihara[50] and leaned
against the doorpost and wept: "I am still but a learner,[51] and
still have to strive for my own perfection. But, alas, my Master, who
was so compassionate towards me, is about to pass away!"

33. And the Blessed One spoke to the bhikkhus, saying: "Where,
bhikkhus, is Ananda?"

"The Venerable Ananda, Lord, has gone into the vihara and there
stands leaning against the door post and weeping: 'I am still but a
learner, and still have to strive for my own perfection. But, alas, my
Master, who was so compassionate towards me, is about to pass away!'"

34. Then the Blessed One asked a certain bhikkhu to bring the
Venerable Ananda to him, saying: "Go, bhikkhu, and say to Ananda,
'Friend Ananda, the Master calls you.'"

"So be it, Lord." And that bhikkhu went and spoke to the Venerable
Ananda as the Blessed One had asked him to. And the Venerable Ananda
went to the Blessed One, bowed down to him, and sat down on one side.

35. Then the Blessed One spoke to the Venerable Ananda, saying:
"Enough, Ananda! Do not grieve, do not lament! For have I not taught
from the very beginning that with all that is dear and beloved there
must be change, separation, and severance? Of that which is born, come
into being, compounded, and subject to decay, how can one say: 'May it
not come to dissolution!'? There can be no such state of things. Now
for a long time, Ananda, you have served the Tathagata with
loving-kindness in deed, word, and thought, graciously, pleasantly,
with a whole heart and beyond measure. Great good have you gathered,
Ananda! Now you should put forth energy, and soon you too will be free
from the taints."[52]
Praise of Ananda

36. Then the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying:
"Bhikkhus, the Blessed Ones, Arahants, Fully Enlightened Ones of times
past also had excellent and devoted attendant bhikkhus, such as I have
in Ananda. And so also, bhikkhus, will the Blessed Ones, Arahants,
Fully Enlightened Ones of times to come.

37. "Capable and judicious is Ananda, bhikkhus, for he knows the
proper time for bhikkhus to have audience with the Tathagata, and the
time for bhikkhunis, the time for laymen and for laywomen; the time
for kings and for ministers of state; the time for teachers of other
sects and for their followers.

38. "In Ananda, bhikkhus, are to be found four rare and
superlative qualities. What are the four? If, bhikkhus, a company of
bhikkhus should go to see Ananda, they become joyful on seeing him;
and if he then speaks to them of the Dhamma, they are made joyful by
his discourse; and when he becomes silent, they are disappointed. So
it is also when bhikkhunis, laymen, or laywomen go to see Ananda: they
become joyful on seeing him; and if he then speaks to them of the
Dhamma, they are made joyful by his discourse; and when he becomes
silent, they are disappointed.

39. "In a universal monarch, bhikkhus, are to be found four rare
and superlative qualities. What are those four? If, bhikkhus, a
company of nobles should go to see the universal monarch, they become
joyful on seeing him; and if he then speaks, they are made joyful by
his talk; and when he becomes silent, they are disappointed. So it is
also when a company of brahmans, of householders, or of ascetics goes
to see a universal monarch.

40. "And in just the same way, bhikkhus, in Ananda are to be found
these four rare and superlative qualities."
The Past Glory of Kusinara

41. When this had been said, the Venerable Ananda spoke to the
Blessed One, saying: "Let it not be, Lord, that the Blessed One should
pass away in this mean place, this uncivilized township in the midst
of the jungle, a mere outpost of the province. There are great cities,
Lord, such as Campa, Rajagaha, Savatthi, Saketa, Kosambi, and Benares
— let the Blessed One have his final passing away in one of those. For
in those cities dwell many wealthy nobles and brahmans and
householders who are devotees of the Tathagata, and they will render
due honor to the remains of the Tathagata."

42. "Do not say that, Ananda! Do not say: 'This mean place, this
uncivilized township in the midst of the jungle, a mere outpost of the
province.' In times long past, Ananda, there was a king by the name of
Maha Sudassana, who was a universal monarch, a king of righteousness,
a conqueror of the four quarters of the earth, whose realm was
established in security, and who was endowed with the seven
jewels.[53] And that King Maha Sudassana, Ananda, had his royal
residence here at Kusinara, which was then called Kusavati, and it
extended twelve yojanas from east to west, and seven from north to
south.

43. "And mighty, Ananda, was Kusavati, the capital, prosperous and
well populated, much frequented by people, and abundantly provided
with food. Just as the royal residence of the deities, Alakamanda, is
mighty, prosperous, and well populated, much frequented by deities and
abundantly provided with food, so was the royal capital of Kusavati.

44. "Kusavati, Ananda, resounded unceasingly day and night with
ten sounds — the trumpeting of elephants, the neighing of horses, the
rattling of chariots, the beating of drums and tabours, music and
song, cheers, the clapping of hands, and cries of 'Eat, drink, and be
merry!'
Lamentation of the Mallas

45. "Go now, Ananda, to Kusinara and announce to the Mallas:
'Today, Vasetthas, in the last watch of the night, the Tathagata's
Parinibbana will take place. Approach, O Vasetthas, draw near! Do not
be remorseful later at the thought: "In our township it was that the
Tathagata's Parinibbana took place, but we failed to see him at the
end!"'"

"So be it, Lord." And the Venerable Ananda prepared himself, and
taking bowl and robe, went with a companion to Kusinara.

46. Now at that time the Mallas had gathered in the council hall
for some public business. And the Venerable Ananda approached them and
announced: "Today, Vasetthas, in the last watch of the night, the
Tathagata's Parinibbana will take place. Approach, Vasetthas, draw
near! Do not be remorseful later at the thought: 'In our township it
was that the Tathagata's Parinibbana took place, but we failed to see
him at the end.'"

47. When they heard the Venerable Ananda speak these words, the
Mallas with their sons, their wives, and the wives of their sons, were
sorely grieved, grieved at heart and afflicted; and some, with their
hair all dishevelled, with arms uplifted in despair, wept; flinging
themselves on the ground, they rolled from side to side, lamenting:
"Too soon has the Blessed One come to his Parinibbana! Too soon has
the Happy One come to his Parinibbana! Too soon will the Eye of the
World vanish from sight!"

48. And thus afflicted and filled with grief, the Mallas, with
their sons, their wives, and the wives of their sons, went to the Sala
Grove, the recreation park of the Mallas, to the place where the
Venerable Ananda was.

49. And the thought arose in the Venerable Ananda: "If I were to
allow the Mallas of Kusinara to pay reverence to the Blessed One one
by one, the night will have given place to dawn before they are all
presented to him. Therefore let me divide them up according to clan,
each family in a group, and so present them to the Blessed One thus:
'The Malla of such and such a name, Lord, with his wives and children,
his attendants and his friends, pays homage at the feet of the Blessed
One.'"

50. And the Venerable Ananda divided the Mallas up according to
clan, each family in a group, and presented them to the Blessed One.
So it was that the Venerable Ananda caused the Mallas of Kusinara to
be presented to the Blessed One by clans, each family in a group, even
in the first watch of the night.
The Last Convert

51. Now at that time a wandering ascetic named Subhadda was
dwelling at Kusinara. And Subhadda the wandering ascetic heard it
said: "Today in the third watch of the night, the Parinibbana of the
ascetic Gotama will take place."

52. And the thought arose in him: "I have heard it said by old and
venerable wandering ascetics, teachers of teachers, that the arising
of Tathagatas, Arahants, Fully Enlightened Ones, is rare in the world.
Yet this very day, in the last watch of the night, the Parinibbana of
the ascetic Gotama will take place. Now there is in me a doubt; but to
this extent I have faith in the ascetic Gotama, that he could so teach
me the Dhamma as to remove that doubt."

53. Then the wandering ascetic Subhadda went to the Sala Grove,
the recreation park of the Mallas, and drew near to the Venerable
Ananda, and told the Venerable Ananda his thought. And he spoke to the
Venerable Ananda, saying: "Friend Ananda, it would be good if I could
be allowed into the presence of the ascetic Gotama."

54. But the Venerable Ananda answered him, saying: "Enough, friend
Subhadda! Do not trouble the Tathagata. The Blessed One is weary."

55-56. Yet a second and a third time the wandering ascetic
Subhadda made his request, and a second and a third time the Venerable
Ananda refused him.

57. And the Blessed One heard the talk between them, and he called
the Venerable Ananda and said: "Stop, Ananda! Do not refuse Subhadda.
Subhadda, Ananda, may be allowed into the presence of the Tathagata.
For whatever he will ask me, he will ask for the sake of knowledge,
and not as an offence. And the answer I give him, that he will readily
understand."

58. Thereupon the Venerable Ananda said to the wandering ascetic
Subhadda: "Go then, friend Subhadda, the Blessed One gives you leave."

59. Then the wandering ascetic Subhadda approached the Blessed One
and saluted him courteously. And having exchanged with him pleasant
and civil greetings, the wandering ascetic Subhadda seated himself at
one side and addressed the Blessed One, saying: "There are, Venerable
Gotama, ascetics and brahmans who are heads of great companies of
disciples, who have large retinues, who are leaders of schools, well
known and renowned, and held in high esteem by the multitude, such
teachers as Purana Kassapa, Makkhali Gosala, Ajita Kesakambali,
Pakudha Kaccayana, Sañjaya Belatthaputta, Nigantha Nataputta. Have all
of these attained realization, as each of them would have it believed,
or has none of them, or is it that some have attained realization and
others not?"

60. "Enough, Subhadda! Let it be as it may, whether all of them
have attained realization, as each of them would have it believed, or
whether none of them has, or whether some have attained realization
and others not. I will teach you the Dhamma, Subhadda; listen and heed
it well, and I will speak."

"So be it, Lord."
The Lion's Roar

61. And the Blessed One spoke, saying: "In whatsoever Dhamma and
Discipline, Subhadda, there is not found the Noble Eightfold Path,
neither is there found a true ascetic of the first, second, third, or
fourth degree of saintliness. But in whatsoever Dhamma and Discipline
there is found the Noble Eightfold Path, there is found a true ascetic
of the first, second, third, and fourth degrees of saintliness.[54]
Now in this Dhamma and Discipline, Subhadda, is found the Noble
Eightfold Path; and in it alone are also found true ascetics of the
first, second, third, and fourth degrees of saintliness. Devoid of
true ascetics are the systems of other teachers. But if, Subhadda, the
bhikkhus live righteously, the world will not be destitute of arahats.

62. "In age but twenty-nine was I, Subhadda,
When I renounced the world to seek the Good;
Fifty-one years have passed since then, Subhadda,
And in all that time a wanderer have I been
In the domain of virtue and of truth,
And except therein, there is no saint
(of the first degree).

"And there is none of the second degree, nor of the third degree,
nor of the fourth degree of saintliness. Devoid of true ascetics are
the systems of other teachers. But if, Subhadda, the bhikkhus live
righteously, the world will not be destitute of arahats."

63. When this was said, the wandering ascetic Subhadda spoke to
the Blessed One, saying: "Excellent, O Lord, most excellent, O Lord!
It is as if, Lord, one were to set upright what had been overthrown,
or to reveal what had been hidden, or to show the path to one who had
gone astray, or to light a lamp in the darkness so that those with
eyes might see — even so has the Blessed One set forth the Dhamma in
many ways. And so, O Lord, I take my refuge in the Blessed One, the
Dhamma, and the Community of Bhikkhus. May I receive from the Blessed
One admission to the Order and also the higher ordination."

64. "Whoever, Subhadda, having been formerly a follower of another
creed, wishes to receive admission and higher ordination in this
Dhamma and Discipline, remains on probation for a period of four
months. At the end of those four months, if the bhikkhus are satisfied
with him, they grant him admission and higher ordination as a bhikkhu.
Yet in this matter I recognize differences of personalities."

65. "If, O Lord, whoever, having been formerly a follower of
another creed, wishes to receive admission and higher ordination in
this Dhamma and Discipline, remains on probation for a period of four
months, and at the end of those four months, if the bhikkhus are
satisfied with him, they grant him admission and higher ordination as
a bhikkhu — then I will remain on probation for a period of four
years. And at the end of those four years, if the bhikkhus are
satisfied with me, let them grant me admission and higher ordination
as a bhikkhu."

66. But the Blessed One called the Venerable Ananda and said to
him: "Ananda, let Subhadda be given admission into the Order." And the
Venerable Ananda replied: "So be it, Lord."

67. Then the wandering ascetic Subhadda said to the Venerable
Ananda: "It is a gain to you, friend Ananda, a blessing, that in the
presence of the Master himself you have received the sprinkling of
ordination as a disciple."

68. So it came about that the wandering ascetic Subhadda, in the
presence of the Blessed One, received admission and higher ordination.
And from the time of his ordination the Venerable Subhadda remained
alone, secluded, heedful, ardent, and resolute. And before long he
attained to the goal for which a worthy man goes forth rightly from
home to homelessness, the supreme goal of the holy life; and having by
himself realized it with higher knowledge, he dwelt therein. He knew:
"Destroyed is birth; the higher life is fulfilled; nothing more is to
be done, and beyond this life nothing more remains." And the Venerable
Subhadda became yet another among the arahats, and he was the last
disciple converted by the Blessed One himself.

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The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya Empty Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Book Length

Postby Panga7 on Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:08 pm

Part Six: The Passing Away
The Blessed One's Final Exhortation

1. Now the Blessed One spoke to the Venerable Ananda, saying: "It
may be, Ananda, that to some among you the thought will come: 'Ended
is the word of the Master; we have a Master no longer.' But it should
not, Ananda, be so considered. For that which I have proclaimed and
made known as the Dhamma and the Discipline, that shall be your Master
when I am gone.

2. "And, Ananda, whereas now the bhikkhus address one another as
'friend,' let it not be so when I am gone. The senior bhikkhus,
Ananda, may address the junior ones by their name, their family name,
or as 'friend'; but the junior bhikkhus should address the senior ones
as 'venerable sir' or 'your reverence.'[55]

3. "If it is desired, Ananda, the Sangha may, when I am gone,
abolish the lesser and minor rules.[56]

4. "Ananda, when I am gone, let the higher penalty be imposed upon
the bhikkhu Channa."[57]

"But what, Lord, is the higher penalty?"

"The bhikkhu Channa, Ananda, may say what he will, but the
bhikkhus should neither converse with him, nor exhort him, nor
admonish him."

5. Then the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "It may
be, bhikkhus, that one of you is in doubt or perplexity as to the
Buddha, the Dhamma, or the Sangha, the path or the practice. Then
question, bhikkhus! Do not be given to remorse later on with the
thought: 'The Master was with us face to face, yet face to face we
failed to ask him.'"

6. But when this was said, the bhikkhus were silent. And yet a
second and a third time the Blessed One said to them: "It may be,
bhikkhus, that one of you is in doubt or perplexity as to the Buddha,
the Dhamma, or the Sangha, the path or the practice. Then question,
bhikkhus! Do not be given to remorse later on with the thought: 'The
Master was with us face to face, yet face to face we failed to ask
him.'"

And for a second and a third time the bhikkhus were silent. Then
the Blessed One said to them: "It may be, bhikkhus, out of respect for
the Master that you ask no questions. Then, bhikkhus, let friend
communicate it to friend." Yet still the bhikkhus were silent.

7. And the Venerable Ananda spoke to the Blessed One, saying:
"Marvellous it is, O Lord, most wonderful it is! This faith I have in
the community of bhikkhus, that not even one bhikkhu is in doubt or
perplexity as to the Buddha, the Dhamma, or the Sangha, the path or
the practice."

"Out of faith, Ananda, you speak thus. But here, Ananda, the
Tathagata knows for certain that among this community of bhikkhus
there is not even one bhikkhu who is in doubt or perplexity as to the
Buddha, the Dhamma, or the Sangha, the path or the practice. For,
Ananda, among these five hundred bhikkhus even the lowest is a
stream-enterer, secure from downfall, assured, and bound for
enlightenment."

8. And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold
now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to
vanish. Strive with earnestness!"[58]

This was the last word of the Tathagata.
How the Blessed One Passed into Nibbana

9. And the Blessed One entered the first jhana. Rising from the
first jhana, he entered the second jhana. Rising from the second
jhana, he entered the third jhana. Rising from the third jhana, he
entered the fourth jhana. And rising out of the fourth jhana, he
entered the sphere of infinite space. Rising from the attainment of
the sphere of infinite space, he entered the sphere of infinite
consciousness. Rising from the attainment of the sphere of infinite
consciousness, he entered the sphere of nothingness. Rising from the
attainment of the sphere of nothingness, he entered the sphere of
neither-perception-nor-non-perception. And rising out of the
attainment of the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception, he
attained to the cessation of perception and feeling.

10. And the Venerable Ananda spoke to the Venerable Anuruddha,
saying: "Venerable Anuruddha, the Blessed One has passed away."

"No, friend Ananda, the Blessed One has not passed away. He has
entered the state of the cessation of perception and feeling."[59]

11. Then the Blessed One, rising from the cessation of perception
and feeling, entered the sphere of
neither-perception-nor-non-perception. Rising from the attainment of
the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception, he entered the
sphere of nothingness. Rising from the attainment of the sphere of
nothingness, he entered the sphere of infinite consciousness. Rising
from the attainment of the sphere of infinite consciousness, he
entered the sphere of infinite space. Rising from the attainment of
the sphere of infinite space, he entered the fourth jhana. Rising from
the fourth jhana, he entered the third jhana. Rising from the third
jhana, he entered the second jhana. Rising from the second jhana, he
entered the first jhana.

Rising from the first jhana, he entered the second jhana. Rising
from the second jhana, he entered the third jhana. Rising from the
third jhana, he entered the fourth jhana. And, rising from the fourth
jhana, the Blessed One immediately passed away.
The World's Echo

12. And when the Blessed One had passed away, simultaneously with
his Parinibbana there came a tremendous earthquake, dreadful and
astounding, and the thunders rolled across the heavens.

13. And when the Blessed One had passed away, simultaneously with
his Parinibbana, Brahma Sahampati[60] spoke this stanza:
All must depart — all beings that have life Must shed their
compound forms. Yea, even one, A Master such as he, a peerless being,
Powerful in wisdom, the Enlightened One, has passed away.

14. And when the Blessed One had passed away, simultaneously with
his Parinibbana, Sakka, king of the gods,[61] spoke this stanza:
Transient are all compounded things, Subject to arise and vanish;
Having come into existence they pass away; Good is the peace when they
forever cease.

15. And when the Blessed One had passed away, simultaneously with
his Parinibbana, the Venerable Anuruddha spoke this stanza:
No movement of the breath, but with steadfast heart, Free from
desires and tranquil — so the sage Comes to his end. By mortal pangs
unshaken, His mind, like a flame extinguished, finds release.

16. And when the Blessed One had passed away, simultaneously with
his Parinibbana, the Venerable Ananda spoke this stanza:
Then there was terror, and the hair stood up, when he, The
All-accomplished One, the Buddha, passed away.

17. Then, when the Blessed One had passed away, some bhikkhus, not
yet freed from passion, lifted up their arms and wept; and some,
flinging themselves on the ground, rolled from side to side and wept,
lamenting: "Too soon has the Blessed One come to his Parinibbana! Too
soon has the Happy One come to his Parinibbana! Too soon has the Eye
of the World vanished from sight!"

But the bhikkhus who were freed from passion, mindful and clearly
comprehending, reflected in this way: "Impermanent are all compounded
things. How could this be otherwise?"

18. And the Venerable Anuruddha addressed the bhikkhus, saying:
"Enough, friends! Do not grieve, do not lament! For has not the
Blessed One declared that with all that is dear and beloved there must
be change, separation, and severance? Of that which is born, come into
being, compounded and subject to decay, how can one say: 'May it not
come to dissolution!'? The deities, friends, are aggrieved."

"But, venerable sir, of what deities is the Venerable Anuruddha aware?"

"There are deities, friend Ananda, in space and on the earth who
are earthly-minded; with dishevelled hair they weep, with uplifted
arms they weep; flinging themselves on the ground, they roll from side
to side, lamenting: 'Too soon has the Blessed One come to his
Parinibbana! Too soon has the Happy One come to his Parinibbana! Too
soon has the Eye of the World vanished from sight!' But those deities
who are freed from passion, mindful and clearly comprehending, reflect
in this way: 'Impermanent are all compounded things. How could this be
otherwise?'"

19. Now the Venerable Anuruddha and the Venerable Ananda spent the
rest of the night in talking on the Dhamma. Then the Venerable
Anuruddha spoke to the Venerable Ananda, saying: "Go now, friend
Ananda, to Kusinara, and announce to the Mallas: 'The Blessed One,
Vasetthas, has passed away. Do now as seems fitting to you.'"

"So be it, venerable sir." And the Venerable Ananda prepared
himself in the forenoon, and taking bowl and robe, went with a
companion into Kusinara.

20. At that time the Mallas of Kusinara had gathered in the
council hall to consider that very matter. And the Venerable Ananda
approached them and announced: "The Blessed One, Vasetthas, has passed
away. Do now as seems fitting to you."

And when they heard the Venerable Ananda speak these words, the
Mallas with their sons, their wives, and the wives of their sons, were
sorely grieved, grieved at heart and afflicted; and some, with their
hair all dishevelled, with arms upraised in despair, wept; flinging
themselves on the ground, they rolled from side to side, lamenting:
"Too soon has the Blessed One come to his Parinibbana! "Too soon has
the Happy One come to his Parinibbana! Too soon has the Eye of the
World vanished from sight!"
Homage to the Remains

21. Then the Mallas of Kusinara gave orders to their men, saying:
"Gather now all the perfumes, flower-garlands, and musicians, even all
that are in Kusinara." And the Mallas, with the perfumes, the
flower-garlands, and the musicians, and with five hundred sets of
clothing, went to the Sala Grove, the recreation park of the Mallas,
and approached the body of the Blessed One. And having approached,
they paid homage to the body of the Blessed One with dance, song,
music, flower-garlands, and perfume, and erecting canopies and
pavilions, they spent the day showing respect, honor, and veneration
to the body of the Blessed One. And then the thought came to them:
"Now the day is too far spent for us to cremate the body of the
Blessed One. Tomorrow we will do it."

And for the second day, and a third, fourth, fifth, and sixth day,
they paid homage to the body of the Blessed One with dance, song,
music, flower-garlands, and perfume, and erecting canopies and
pavilions, they spent the day showing respect, honor, and veneration
to the body of the Blessed One.

But on the seventh day the thought came to them: "We have paid
homage to the body of the Blessed One with dance, song, music,
flower-garlands, and perfume, and have shown respect, honor, and
veneration; let us now carry the body of the Blessed One southward to
the southern part of the town and beyond, and let us there cremate the
body of the Blessed One south of the town."

And eight Mallas of the foremost families, bathed from the crown
of their heads and wearing new clothes, with the thought: "We will
lift up the body of the Blessed One," tried to do so but they could
not.

22. Then the Mallas spoke to the Venerable Anuruddha, saying:
"What is the cause, Venerable Anuruddha, what is the reason that these
eight Mallas of the foremost families, bathed from the crown of their
heads and wearing new clothes, with the thought: 'We will lift up the
body of the Blessed One,' try to do so but cannot?"

"You, Vasetthas, have one purpose, the deities have another."

"Then what, venerable sir, is the purpose of the deities?"

"Your purpose, Vasetthas, is this: 'We have paid homage to the
body of the Blessed One with dance, song, music, flower-garlands, and
perfume, and have shown respect, honor, and veneration; let us now
carry the body of the Blessed One southward to the southern part of
the town and beyond, and let us there cremate the body of the Blessed
One south of the town.' But the purpose of the deities, Vasetthas, is
this: 'We have paid homage to the body of the Blessed One with
heavenly dance, song, music, flower-garlands, and perfume, and have
shown respect, honor, and veneration; let us now carry the body of the
Blessed One northward to the northern part of the town; and having
carried it through the northern gate, let us go through the center of
the town, and then eastward to the east of the town; and having passed
through the east gate, let us carry it to the cetiya of the Mallas,
Makuta-bandhana, and there let us cremate the body of the Blessed
One.'"

"As the deities wish, venerable sir, so let it be."

23. Thereupon the whole of Kusinara, even to the dust heaps and
rubbish heaps, became covered knee-deep in mandarava flowers.[62] And
homage was paid to the body of the Blessed One by the deities as well
as the Mallas of Kusinara. With dance, song, music, flower-garlands,
and perfume, both divine and human, respect, honor, and veneration
were shown. And they carried the body of the Blessed One northward to
the northern part of the town; and having carried it through the
northern gate, they went through the center of the town, and then
eastward to the east of the town; and having passed through the east
gate, they carried the body of the Blessed One to the cetiya of the
Mallas, Makuta-bandhana, and there laid it down.

24. Then the Mallas of Kusinara spoke to the Venerable Ananda,
saying: "How should we act, Venerable Ananda, respecting the body of
the Tathagata?"

"After the same manner, Vasetthas, as towards the body of a
universal monarch."

"But how, venerable Ananda, do they act respecting the body of a
universal monarch?"

"The body of a universal monarch, Vasetthas, is first wrapped
round with new linen, and then with teased cotton wool. And again it
is wrapped round with new linen, and again with teased cotton wool,
and so it is done up to five hundred layers of linen and five hundred
of cotton wool. When that is done, the body of the universal monarch
is placed in an iron oil-vessel, which is enclosed in another iron
vessel and a funeral pyre is built of all kinds of perfumed woods, and
so the body of the universal monarch is burned. And at a crossroads a
stupa is raised for the universal monarch. So it is done, Vasetthas,
with the body of a universal monarch.

"And even, Vasetthas, as with the body of a universal monarch, so
should it be done with the body of the Tathagata; and at a crossroads
also a stupa should be raised for the Tathagata. And whoever shall
bring to that place garlands or incense or sandalwood paste, or pay
reverence, and whose mind becomes calm there — it will be to his well
being and happiness for a long time."

25. Then the Mallas gave orders to their men, saying: "Gather now
all the teased cotton wool of the Mallas!" And the Mallas of Kusinara
wrapped the body of the Blessed One round with new linen, and then
with teased cotton wool. And again they wrapped it round with new
linen, and again with teased cotton wool, and so it was done up to
five hundred layers of linen and five hundred of cotton wool. When
that was done, they placed the body of the Blessed One in an iron
oil-vessel, which was enclosed in another iron vessel, and they built
a funeral pyre of all kinds of perfumed woods, and upon it they laid
the body of the Blessed One.

26. Now at that time the Venerable Maha Kassapa[63] was journeying
from Pava to Kusinara together with a large company of five hundred
bhikkhus. And on the way, the Venerable Maha Kassapa went aside from
the highway and sat down at the foot of a tree.

And a certain Ajivaka came by, on his way to Pava, and he had
taken a mandarava flower from Kusinara. And the Venerable Maha Kassapa
saw the Ajivaka coming from a distance, and as he drew close he spoke
to him, saying: "Do you know, friend, anything of our Master?"

"Yes, friend, I know. It is now seven days since the ascetic
Gotama passed away. From there I have brought this mandarava flower."

27. Thereupon some bhikkhus, not yet freed from passion, lifted up
their arms and wept; and some, flinging themselves on the ground,
rolled from side to side and wept, lamenting: "Too soon has the
Blessed One come to his Parinibbana! Too soon has the Happy One come
to his Parinibbana! Too soon has the Eye of the World vanished from
sight!"

28. Now at that time, one Subhadda, who had renounced only in his
old age, was seated in the assembly.[64] And he addressed the
bhikkhus, saying: "Enough, friends! Do not grieve, do not lament! We
are well rid of that great ascetic. Too long, friends, have we been
oppressed by his saying: 'This is fitting for you; that is not fitting
for you.' Now we shall be able to do as we wish, and what we do not
wish, that we shall not do."

But the Venerable Maha Kassapa addressed the bhikkhus, saying:
"Enough friends! Do not grieve, do not lament! For has not the Blessed
One declared that with all that is dear and beloved there must be
change, separation, and severance? Of that which is born, come into
being, compounded, and subject to decay, how can one say: 'May it not
come to dissolution!'?"

29. Now at that time four Mallas of the foremost families, bathed
from the crown of their heads and wearing new clothes, with the
thought: "We will set alight the Blessed One's pyre," tried to do so
but they could not. And the Mallas spoke to the Venerable Anuruddha,
saying: "What is the cause, Venerable Anuruddha, what is the reason
that these four Mallas of the foremost families, bathed from the crown
of their heads and wearing new clothes, with the thought: "We will set
alight the Blessed One's pyre,' try to do so but cannot?"

"You, Vasetthas, have one purpose, the deities have another."

"Then what, venerable sir, is the purpose of the deities?"

"The purpose of the deities, Vasetthas, is this: 'The Venerable
Maha Kassapa is on his way from Pava to Kusinara together with a large
company of five hundred bhikkhus. Let not the Blessed One's pyre be
set alight until the Venerable Maha Kassapa has paid homage at the
feet of the Blessed One.'"

"As the deities wish, venerable sir, so let it be."

30. And the Venerable Maha Kassapa approached the pyre of the
Blessed One, at the cetiya of the Mallas, Makuta-bandhana, in
Kusinara. And he arranged his upper robe on one shoulder, and with his
clasped hands raised in salutation, he walked three times round the
pyre, keeping his right side towards the Blessed One's body, and he
paid homage at the feet of the Blessed One. And even so did the five
hundred bhikkhus.

And when homage had been paid by the Venerable Maha Kassapa and
the five hundred bhikkhus, the pyre of the Blessed One burst into
flame by itself.

31. And it came about that when the body of the Blessed One had
been burned, no ashes or particles were to be seen of what had been
skin, tissue, flesh, sinews, and fluid; only bones remained. Just as
when ghee or oil is burned, it leaves no particles or ashes behind,
even so when the body of the Blessed One had been burned, no ashes or
particles were to be seen of what had been skin, tissue, flesh,
sinews, and fluid; only bones remained. And of the five hundred linen
wrappings, only two were not consumed, the innermost and the
outermost.

32. And when the body of the Blessed One had been burned, water
rained down from heaven and extinguished the pyre of the Blessed One,
and from the sala trees water came forth, and the Mallas of Kusinara
brought water scented with many kinds of perfumes, and they too
extinguished the pyre of the Blessed One.

And the Mallas of Kusinara laid the relics of the Blessed One in
their council hall, and surrounded them with a lattice-work of spears
and encircled them with a fence of bows; and there for seven days they
paid homage to the relics of the Blessed One with dance, song, music,
flower-garlands, and perfume, and showed respect, honor, and
veneration to the relics of the Blessed One.
Partition of the Relics

33. Then the king of Magadha, Ajatasattu, son of the Videhi queen,
came to know that at Kusinara the Blessed One had passed away. And he
sent a message to the Mallas of Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was
of the warrior caste, and I am too. I am worthy to receive a portion
of the relics of the Blessed One. I will erect a stupa over the relics
of the Blessed One and hold a festival in their honor."

34. And the Licchavis of Vesali came to know that at Kusinara the
Blessed One had passed away. And they sent a message to the Mallas of
Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was of the warrior caste, and we
are too. We are worthy to receive a portion of the relics of the
Blessed One. We will erect a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One
and hold a festival in their honor."

35. And the Sakyas of Kapilavatthu came to know that at Kusinara
the Blessed One had passed away. And they sent a message to the Mallas
of Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was the greatest of our clan. We
are worthy to receive a portion of the relics of the Blessed One. We
will erect a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One and hold a
festival in their honor."

36. And the Bulis of Allakappa came to know that at Kusinara the
Blessed One had passed away. And they sent a message to the Mallas of
Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was of the warrior caste, and we
are too. We are worthy to receive a portion of the relics of the
Blessed One. We will erect a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One
and hold a festival in their honor."

37. And the Kolis of Ramagama came to know that at Kusinara the
Blessed One had passed away. And they sent a message to the Mallas of
Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was of the warrior caste, and we
are too. We are worthy to receive a portion of the relics of the
Blessed One. We will erect a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One
and hold a festival in their honor."

38. And the Vethadipa brahman came to know that at Kusinara the
Blessed One had passed away. And he sent a message to the Mallas of
Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was of the warrior caste, and I am
a brahman. I am worthy to receive a portion of the relics of the
Blessed One. I will erect a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One
and hold a festival in their honor."

39. And the Mallas of Pava came to know that at Kusinara the
Blessed One had passed away. And they sent a message to the Mallas of
Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was of the warrior caste, and we
are too. We are worthy to receive a portion of the relics of the
Blessed One. We will erect a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One
and hold a festival in their honor."

40. But when they heard these words, the Mallas of Kusinara
addressed the assembly, saying: "The Blessed One has passed away in
our township. We shall not part with any portion of the relics of the
Blessed One." Then the brahman Dona spoke to the assembly, saying:
One word from me, I beg you, sirs, to hear! Our Buddha taught us
ever to forbear; Unseemly would it be should strife arise And war and
bloodshed, over the custody Of his remains, who was the best of men!
Let us all, sirs, in friendliness agree To share eight portions — so
that far and wide Stupas may rise, and seeing them, mankind Faith in
the All-Enlightened One will find!

"So be it, brahman! Divide the relics into eight equal portions yourself."

And the brahman Dona said to the assembly: "So be it, sirs." And
he divided justly into eight equal portions the relics of the Blessed
One, and having done so, he addressed the assembly, saying: "Let this
urn, sirs, be given to me. Over this urn I will erect a stupa, and in
its honor I will hold a festival." And the urn was given to the
brahman Dona.

41. Then the Moriyas of Pipphalivana came to know that at Kusinara
the Blessed One had passed away. And they sent a message to the Mallas
of Kusinara, saying: "The Blessed One was of the warrior caste, and we
are too. We are worthy to receive a portion of the relics of the
Blessed One. We will erect a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One
and hold a festival in their honor."

"There is no portion of the relics of the Blessed One remaining;
the relics of the Blessed One have been divided. But take from here
the ashes." And they took from there the ashes.

42. And the king of Magadha, Ajatasattu, son of the Videhi queen,
erected a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One at Rajagaha, and in
their honor held a festival. The Licchavis of Vesali erected a stupa
over the relics of the Blessed One at Vesali, and in their honor held
a festival. The Sakyas of Kapilavatthu erected a stupa over the relics
of the Blessed One at Kapilavatthu, and in their honor held a
festival. The Bulis of Allakappa erected a stupa over the relics of
the Blessed One at Allakappa, and in their honor held a festival. The
Kolis of Ramagama erected a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One
at Ramagama, and in their honor held a festival. The Vethadipa brahman
erected a stupa over the relics of the Blessed One at Vethadipa, and
in their honor held a festival. The Mallas of Pava erected a stupa
over the relics of the Blessed One at Pava, and in their honor held a
festival. The Mallas of Kusinara erected a stupa over the relics of
the Blessed One at Kusinara, and in their honor held a festival. The
brahman Dona erected a stupa over the urn, and in its honor held a
festival. And the Moriyas of Pipphalivana erected a stupa over the
ashes at Pipphalivana, and in their honor held a festival.

So it came about that there were eight stupas for the relics, a
ninth for the urn, and a tenth for the ashes.

And thus it was in the days of old.
43. Eight portions there were of the relics of him, The All-Seeing
One, the greatest of men. Seven in Jambudipa are honored, and one In
Ramagama, by kings of the Naga race. One tooth is honored in the
Tavatimsa heaven, One in the realm of Kalinga, and one by the Naga
kings. Through their brightness this bountiful earth With its most
excellent gifts is endowed; For thus the relics of the All-Seeing One
are best honored By those who are worthy of honor — by gods and Nagas
And lords of men, yea, by the highest of mankind. Pay homage with
clasped hands! For hard indeed it is Through hundreds of ages to meet
with an All-Enlightened One![65]

Panga7

Posts: 267
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Book Length

Postby Panga7 on Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:14 pm
So Buddha chose at the beginning of Long Discourse #16 7 Principles
for Preventing Decline which includes not forceably abducting the
daughters of tribes and compelling them to live with them against
their will.

Such may be helpful to correct the mispercetion of a war like person
which is also relevant to our historical replay feature about WWII.

During World War Two the German military was very miserable about the
conflict they encountered in attempting to conquer in such a way that
there was a plan to kill Hitler.

Rather that try to force women to live with them against their will,
if someone should want to win a woman then a better idea to try to
focus upon is helping with the duties of a Dharmaraja.

Additionally Buddha took abvantage of the opportunity to reiterate to
his disciples about princples which would lead future generations to
success, to preventing decline in the future.

Panga7

Posts: 267
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Book Length

Postby Panga7 on Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:26 pm
Middle Length Discourse #48 which includes the 6 memorable qualities
referred to towards the beginning of section 1 of Long Discourse of
the Buddha #16.

I heard thus.

At one time the Blessed One was living in Ghosita’s monastery in
Kosambi. At that time the bhikkhus of Kosambi had aroused a dispute
and were quarrelling with each other, throwing sharp words at each
other They would not discuss the matter among themselves and come to
an understanding. A certain bhikkhu approached the Blessed One,
worshipped, sat on a side and said, Venerable sir, the bhikkhus of
Kosambi have aroused a dispute and are quarrelling with each other,
throwing sharp words at each other. They would not discuss the matter
among themselves and come to an understanding. Then the Blessed One
addressed a certain bhikkhu: Come bhikkhu in my words address those
bhikkhus, and tell, the Teacher wants you. That bhikkhu agreed,
approached those bhikkhus, and said Bhikkhus, the Teacher wants you:
Those bhikkhus agreed, approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat
on a side. Then the Blessed One said to those bhikkhus; Bhikkhus, is
it true that you have aroused a dispute among yourselves are
quarrelling with each other throwing sharp words at each other.You
wouldn’t discuss the matter among yourselves and come to an
understanding? Yes, venerable sir.Bhikkhus, at a time when you have
aroused a dispute among yourselves are quarrelling with each other
throwing sharp words at each other, are you established in bodily
actions of loving kindness, towards co-associates in the holy life
openly and secretly? Established in verbal actions of loving kindness,
towards co-associates in the holy life openly and secretly? Establishd
in mental actions of loving kindness, towards co-associates in the
holy life openly and secretly? No, venerable sir.Bhikkhus, you have
aroused a dispute among yourselves quarrelling with each other,
throwing sharp words at each other.Now you are not established in
bodily actions of loving kindness, towards co-associates in the holy
life openly or secretly. You are not established in verbal actions of
loving kindness, towards co-associates in the holy life openly or
secretly. You are not established in mental actions of loving
kindness, towards co-associates in the holy life openly or secretly.
Foolish men, seeing what good have you aroused this dispute? You do
not discuss this matter among yourselves and come to an understanding.
Foolish men, this will be for your undoing for a long time

Then the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus: Bhikkhus, there are
six things which conduces to reverence, unity, friendliness and love
for each other. What six: Here, bhikkhus, the bhikkhu should be
establishd in bodily actions of loving kindness towards co-associates
in the holy life openly and secretly. This is a thing which conduces
to reverence, unity, friendliness and love for each other. Again, the
bhikkhu should be established in verbal actions of loving kindness
towards co-associates in the holy life openly and secretly. This too
is a thing which conduces to reverence, unity, friendliness and love
for each other. Again the bhikkhu should be established in mental
actions of loving kindness towards co-associates in the holy life
openly and secretly. This too is a thing that conduces to reverence,
unity, friendliness and love for each other. Again bhikkhus, gains
rightfully obtained, as far as what is put into the bowl, the bhikkhu
would not partake without sharing equally with the co-associates in
the holy life. This too is a thing that conduces to reverence, unity,
friendliness and love for each other. Again the bhikkhu becomes equal
in virtues with the co-associates in the holy life openly and
secretly. The virtues that are not broken, fissured or spotted, are
consistent and praised by the wise as unaffected and conductive to
concentration. This too is a thing that conduces to reverence, unity,
friendliness and love for each other . Again the bhikkhu becomes equal
with the co-associates in the holy life in the noble view that leads
to the beyond.Which rightfully shows the destruction of unpleasantness
to one who thinks logically. This too is a thing that conduces to
reverence, unity, friendliness and love for each other. Bhikkhus,
these are the six things that conduces to reverence, unity,
frendliness and love for each other. Bhikkhus, of these six the noble
view that leads to the beyond and rightfully shows the destruction of
unpleasantness to one who thinks logically is the foremost and the
chief. It binds all others at the top most beam of the gabled house.
..

Bhikkhus, what is that noble view that leads to the beyond and
rightfully shows the destruction of unpleasantness to one who thinks
logically. Here. Bhikkhus, the bhikkhu gone to a forest or to the root
of a tree, or to an empty house reflects. Are there undispelled
hindrances in me? Do they obstruct my mind, from knowing and seeing as
it really is? Am I overcome by sensual lust, or is my mind hindered by
them? Am I overcome by anger, or is my mind hindered by it? Am I
overcome by sloth and torpor, or is my mind hindered by sloth and
torpor? Am I overcome by restlessness and worry, or is my mind
hindered by restlessness and worry? Is my mind overcome with doubts,
about this world and the other world? Or am I with a dispute
quarrelling, throwing rough words at others, is my mind hindered in
this manner?

The bhikkhu knows, I haven’t undispelled hindrances on account of
which my mind would not see it, as it really is.These things are
thoroughly dispelled from my mind and it is ready for realising the
truth. This is the first noble knowledge attained, not of the world
and not shared by the ordinary (*1).

Again, the noble disciple reflects When I practise and develop
this view much, I experience internal appeasement, and internal
extinction (*2). This is the second noble knowledge attained, not of
the world and not shared by the ordinary.

Again the noble disciple reflects. This view I have gained is it
also the view of the recluses and brahmins of other sects. Then he
knows, this view with which I am endowed, is not shared by recluses
and brahmins of other sects. This is the third noble knowledge
attained, not of the world and not shared by the ordinary.

Again, bhikkhus, the noble disciple reflects. I share this view
with those come to righteousness of view. I’m also endowed with that
unique characteristic. Bhikkhus, what is that unique characteristic of
one come to righteousness or view? When he does any wrong, it becomes
manifest to him, and he instantly goes to the Teacher or a wise
co-associate in the holy life and declares and makes it manifest and
makes amends for future restrain, like a toddler who is slow to stand
and lie would tred on a burning piece of charcoal and would instantly
pull away from it. In the same manner when he does any wrong, it
becomes manifest to him, and he instantly goes to the Teacher or a
wise co-associate in the holy life and declares and makes amends for
future restrain. This is a unique character of one come to
righteousness of view. This is the fourth noble knowledge attained,
not of the world and not shared by the ordinary.

Again, bhikkhus, the noble disciple reflects. I share this view,
with those come to righteousness of view. I’m also endowed with that
unique characteristic. Bhikkhus, what is that unique characteristic of
one come to righteousness of view? It is the unique characteristic of
one come to righteousness view, to be greatly intent in completing any
work high or low that has to be done for the co-associates in the holy
life. Mindful of the high virtues, training, and high wisdom. Like the
cow which would even pull out the post to which it is tied in an
effort to save her calf. In the same manner would be greatly intent in
completing any work high or low that has to be done for the
co-associates in the holy life. Mindful of the high virtues, much
training and high wisdom. Then he knows, I share this view, with those
come to righteousness of view. I’m endowed with that unigue
characteristic. This is the fifth noble knowledge attained, not of the
world and not shared by the ordinary.

Again, the noble disciple reflects I share this power, with those
come to righteousness of view. I’m endowed with that power.What is
that power with which the one come to righteousness of view is
endowed?.One come to righteousness of view listens to the Teaching
attending carefully to take the essential with the mind well
concentrated. Then he knows, I’m endowed with the power of one come to
righteousness of view. This is the sixth noble knowledge attained, not
of the world and not shared by the ordinary.

Again, the noble disciple reflects.I share this power, with those
come to righteousness of view. I’m endowed, with that power What is
that power with which the one come to righteousness of view is
endowed?. It is the power of one come to righteousness of view to
listen to the Teaching taught by the Blessed One and gain the
meanings, experience the Teaching and experience the joy. Then he
knows, with whatever power the one, come to righteousness of view is
endowed, I too share that power. . This is the seventh noble knowledge
attained, not of the world and not shared by the ordinary.

When the noble disciple is endowed with these seven
characteristics, he is ready to realise the fruits of the entry into
the stream of the Teaching.

The Blessed One said thus and those bhikkhus delighted in the
words of the Blessed One.

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Book Length

Postby Panga7 on Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:43 pm
Middle Length Discourse #104, Discourse at Samagama

This discourse also contains the 6 Memorable Qualities.

I heard thus.

At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in their
village Sàmagàma. At that time Niganña Nàtaputta had recently died at
Pàvà. When he died the Niganñas had split and were quarrelling,
fighting and attacking each other with the weapon in their mouths.
They were saying things like these. `You do not know this Teaching and
Discipline, I know it. What do you know of it? You have fallen to the
wrong method. I have fallen to the right method with reasons. You say
the first things last, the last things first. Your dispute is not
thought out, it is reversed and made up and should be rebuked. Go!
dispute and find your way, if possible'. The dispensation of Niganña
Nàtaputta had gone to destruction. The lay disciples of
Niganñanàtaputta, who wore white clothes too were broken up,
uninterested, hindered and without refuge as it happens in a
Dispensation, not well taught, by one not rightfully enlightened.

The novice Cunda spent the rains in Pàvà, approached venerable
ânanda in Sàmagàma, worshipped and sat on a side and said to venerable
ânanda. `Venerable sir, Niganña Nàtaputta died recently at Pàvà. After
his death the Niganñas have split, are quarrelling, fighting, are
attacking each other with the weapon in their mouths. They are saying
things like these. `You do not know this Teaching and Discipline, I
know it. What do you know of it? You have fallen to the wrong method.
I have fallen to the right method with reasons. You say the first
things last, the last things first. Your dispute is not thought out,
is reversed and made up and should be rebuked. Go! dispute and find
your way, if possible. The dispensation of Niganña Nàtaputta had gone
to destruction. The lay disciples of Niganñanàtaputta, who wore white
clothes too were broken up, uninterested, hindered and without refuge
as it happens in a Dispensation, not well taught, by one not
rightfully enlightened'. When this was said, venerable ânanda said.
`Friend, Cunda, this has to be told to the Blessed One. Let us
approach the Blessed One and inform about it to the Blessed One.'

Venerable C unda agreed and venerable ânanda and the novice Cunda
approached the Blessed One, worshipped, sat on a side and venerable
ânanda said to the Blessed One,' Venerable sir, the novice Cunda says,
that Niganña Nàtaputta has died recently at Pàvà. After his death the
Niganñas have split, are quarrelling, fighting, are attacking each
other with the weapon in their mouths. They are saying things like
these. `You do not know this Teaching and Discipline, I know it. What
do you know of it? You have fallen to the wrong method. I have fallen
to the right method, with reasons. You say the first things last, the
last things first. Your dispute is not thought out, is reversed and
made up and should be rebuked. Go! dispute and find your way, if
possble. The dispensation of Niganña Nàtaputta had gone to
destruction. The lay disciples of Niganñanàtaputta, who wore white
clothes too were broken up, uninterested, hindered and without refuge
as it happens in a Dispensation, not well taught, by one not
rightfully enlightened. Venerable sir, it occurs to me at the demise
of the Blessed One, may there be no dispute, for the good and welfare
of many.'

ßânanda, do you see any instance in this Teaching, by me realized
and proclaimed where two bhikkhus could dispute, such as in the four
establishments of mindfulness, the four right endeavours, the four
psychic powers, the five mental faculties, the five powers, the seven
enlightenment factors and the eightfold path?' `Venerable sir, in this
Teaching realized and proclaimed by the Blessed One I do not see an
instance where two bhikkhus could dispute, such as in the four
establishments of mindfulness, the four right endeavours, the four
psychic powers, the five mental faculties, the five powers, the seven
enlightenment factors and the eightfold path.

Yet those persons who live as though obedient to the Blessed One
now, will arouse a dispute on account of the hard livelihood because
of the higher code of rules, it will be not for the well being of many
and the well being of gods and men,' ânanda, a dispute on the harsh
livelihood or the higher code of rules is negligible, if the community
has a dispute about the path and method, it will be for the
unpleasantness of many, and the unpleasantness of gods and men.

ânanda, these six are the causes for a dispute. What are the six?
When the bhikkhu becomes angry and bears a grudge, he becomes unruly
even towards the Teacher, rebels against the Teaching and becomes
unruly, rebels against the Community and becomes unruly, does not live
complete in the training. Thus he arouses a dispute in the Community,
for the unpleasantness of many and the unpleasantness of gods and men.
ânanda, if you see this cause for a dispute internally or externally,
you should make effort for the dispelling of that cause for a dispute,
and for its non arising again.

Again, ânanda, the bhikkhu is merciless with hypocrisy ...re...
jealous and selfish, re... crafty and fraudulent, ...re... is with
evil desires and wrong view, ...re. holding fast to worldly matters
and not giving up easily. When the bhikkhu holds fast to worldly
matters and does not give up easily, he becomes unruly even towards
the Teacher, rebels against the Teaching and becomes unruly, rebels
against the Community and becomes unruly, does not live complete in
the training. Thus he arouses a dispute in the Community, for the
unpleasantness of many and the unpleasantness of gods and men. ânanda,
if you see this cause for a dispute internally or externally, you
should make effort for the dispelling of that cause for a dispute, and
for its non arising again. This is dispelling the evil causes of
disputes, for their non arising in the future. ânanda, these are the
six causes for disputes.

ânanda, there are four administrations What are the four? The
questions of disputes, questions of censure, questions of misconduct
and questions of duties. ânanda, there are seven ways to settle all
these disputes. Proceeings done in the presence of the accused,
appealing to the conscience of the accused, acquittal on grounds of
restored sanity, agreement by a promise, acquittal by a majority vote
of the chapter, acquital for evil desires and covering up the whole
thing without going to details.

ânanda how are the proceedings done in the presence of the
accused? The bhikkhu disputes, this is the Teaching and this is not
the Teaching, this is the Discipline and this is not the Discipline.
Then all the bhikkhus unite and get together and examine it according
to the Teaching and should approve and settle it. Thus the proceedings
are done in the presence of the accused.

ânanda, how is the acquittal by a majority vote of the chapter? It
is not possible to settle this in that same monastery, should go to a
place where there is a larger number of bhikkhus Then all the bhikkhus
unite and get together and examine it according to the Teaching and
should approve and settle it To settle that dispute the accued should
be acquitted by a majority vote of the chapter. In this manner too it
is settled.

ânanda, how is the appealing to the conscience? The bhikkhus blame
the bhikkhu of a grave offence, which merits expulsion or something
similar. They ask does the venerable one recall committing this grave
offence, that merits expulsion or something similar. He says,
venerable sirs I do not recall committing this grave offence, that
merits expulsion or something similar. ânanda, it is in this manner,
that his conscience should be disciplined. In this manner too a
dispute is settled disciplining the conscience.

ânanda, how is the acquittal on grounds of restored sanity? The
bhikkhus blame the bhikkhu of a grave offence, which merits expulsion
or something similar. They ask does the venerable one recall
committing this grave offence, that merits expulsion or something
similar. He says, venerable sirs I do not recall committing this grave
offence, that merits expulsion or something similar. Then he should be
well bound by explaining, come on venerable one recall whether you
have done a grave offence or something similar. Then he would say,
friends, I had a mental aberration, my mind went off and I did many
things that should not have been done by a true recluse. I said a lot
of piercing things that should not have been said. These I did out of
delusion and do not remember them. ânanda, he should be acquitted on
grounds of restored sanity. This is the acquittal on grounds of
restored sanity, thus too disputes are settled.

ânanda, how is an agreement by a promise? A bhikkhu accused or not
accused of an offence, recalls and declares it. He should approach an
elderly bhikkhu, arrange his robe on one shoulder, worship his feet,
settle on his feet lowering himself and say. `Venerable sir, I have
done an offence and confess it,' Then the elder bhikkhu would ask. `Do
you see it?' `I see it,' `Have you come to future restraint?' `I have
come to future restraint,' ânanda, this is agreement by a promise,
thus too a dispute is settled.

ânanda, how is the settlement with evil desires? The bhikkhus
blame the bhikkhu of a grave offence, which merits expulsion or
something similar. They ask does the venerable one recall committing
this grave offence, that merits expulsion or something similar. He
says, venerable sirs I do not recall committing this grave offence,
that merits expulsion or something similar. Then he should be well
bound by explaining, come on venerable one recall whether you have
done a grave offence or something similar. Then he would say. `Friends
I know of a small offence, for which I did not feel. If I had
committed a grave offence or something similar, why shouldn't I recall
it?' `Then he is told, you have done a small offence, not feeling have
not declared and acknowledged it. Come on! recall whether you have
done a grave offence or something similar,' Then he would say.
`Friends, I remember doing a grave offence, which merits expulsion or
something similar,' ânanda, thus his evil desires should be settled,
and the dispute is settled'

ßânanda, how is it settled by covering up with grass?' ânanda, the
bhikkhus abide quarrelling, fighting and saying many things, that
should not be utterred by true recluses. Then all the bhikkhus should
get together unitedly. A learned bhikkhu on one side should get up,
arrange the robe on one shoulder, clasping hands should inform the
Community. `Listen to me venerable sirs, when we were quarrelling and
fighting, many things that should not be utterred by true recluses
have been utterred, by you and me too. We have done an offence. For
the good of the Community, you all and me too, may the discussion of
the lay people and the offence be covered up in the presence of the
Community. Then a bhikkhu on the other side should get up, arrange the
robe on one shoulder, clasping hands should inform the Community.
`Listen to me venerable sirs, when we were quarrelling and fighting,
many things that should not be uttered by a true recluse have been
uttered, by you and me too. We have done an offence. For the good of
the Community, you all and me too, may the discussion of the lay
people and the offence be covered up in the presence of the Community.
ânanda, this is covering up with grass, and a dispute is settled by
covering up with grass.

ânanda, there are six things that promote unity, gladness and
friendship, and dispel disputes. What are the six? ânanda, the bhikkhu
should be established in bodily actions of loving kindness [1] towards
co-associates in the holy life openly and secretly. The bhikkhu should
be established in verbal actions of loving kindness [2] towards
co-associates in the holy life openly and secretly. The bhikkhu should
be established in mental actions of loving kindness [3] towards
co-associates in the holy life openly and secretly. Again the bhikkhu
shares equally all rightful gains so far as the morsels put in the
bowl, with the virtuous co-associates in the holy life. Again the
bhikkhu becomes equal in all virtues that are not spotted, fissured,
free of blemish, and praised by the wise as conducive to
concentration, with the co-associates in the holy life. Again the
bhikkhu shares the noble view that rightfully destroys unpleasantness,
[4] of one who logically thinks about it, with the co-associates in
the holy life openly and secretly. ânanda, these six things promote
unity, gladness and friendship and dispel disputes. ânanda, do you see
a single word which is not acceptable among these words?'

ßVenerable sir, I do not see.'

ßTherefore ânanda, be accomplished in these six things that
promote unity, gladness and friendship and dispels disputes, it will
be for your welfare for a long time.'

The Blessed One said thus and venerable ânanda delighted in the
words of the Blessed One.




We have received some communication from people about some
misrepresentation of Buddha' Teaching.

Since this Discourse also contains some Vinaya references, it could be
helpful about discussion in clearing up misrepresentation.

There are some monks who claim to pracitsing very traditional
Classical Buddhism as taught by Samma Sambuddha Gotama and of course
when it is really so that may be excellent.

But sometimes some of what they are doing are actually their own
theories, not Buddha's teaching, and some times they try to take
advantage of some things without taking responsibility.

So we get obliged to remind people to check with the Suttas and the
Vinaya to see what Buddha really said which is important for the
actual fulfillment of the 7 Principles for Preventing Decline and for
the intrinsic excellence of Buddha's teaching about the 7 Principles
for Preventing Decline.

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The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya Empty Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya

Post  Admin on Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:10 am

3
Full Lotus Revata on Wed Apr 11, 2012 3:37 am

The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:13 am

We are in the process of putting together a booklet about the 7
Principles for Success taught by the Buddha to help better explain to
people in various ways about the importance of the 7 Principles for
Success and why they need them to stop such and such types of decline.
We have also started a topic in the Buddhist images section.

This type of work has been marked as a high priority with our service
and our members may consider additonal ways of explaining to people
about the importance of these and various ways of implementation of
these practices in society.

Section from beginning of Long Discourse 16 published by Wisdom
Publications Full Translation Long Discourses of the Buddha previously
published as paperback titled Thus Have I Heard and the same section
which may also be found in the Section of the 7s Vajjian Chapter,
Numerical Discourses of the Buddha, full translation published by Pali
Text Society with title, The Book of the Gradual Sayings



4. At that time the Venerable Ananda [4] was standing behind the
Blessed One, fanning him, and the Blessed One addressed the Venerable
Ananda thus: "What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis have frequent
gatherings, and are their meetings well attended?"

"I have heard, Lord, that this is so."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis assemble and disperse
peacefully and attend to their affairs in concord?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis neither enact new decrees
nor abolish existing ones, but proceed in accordance with their
ancient constitutions?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis show respect, honor,
esteem, and veneration towards their elders and think it worthwhile to
listen to them?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis refrain from abducting
women and maidens of good families and from detaining them?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they refrain from doing so."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis show respect, honor,
esteem, and veneration towards their shrines, both those within the
city and those outside it, and do not deprive them of the due
offerings as given and made to them formerly?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do venerate their shrines, and that
they do not deprive them of their offerings."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis duly protect and guard the
arahats, so that those who have not come to the realm yet might do so,
and those who have already come might live there in peace?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline."

5. And the Blessed One addressed the brahman Vassakara in these words:
"Once, brahman, I dwelt at Vesali, at the Sarandada shrine, and there
it was that I taught the Vajjis these seven conditions leading to (a
nation's) welfare. [5] So long, brahman, as these endure among the
Vajjis, and the Vajjis are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline."
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:27 am

Tithing has continued to be popular and influencial practice in the
world dating back in the Christian Religion to the Book of Daniel and
beyond.

These concerns continue to be relevant today and it has been suggested
that we capitalize on people's vested interest in preventing decline
in our booklet, including with topics such as Operation Mana Conquers
the Nazis.

If people were facing and/or concerned about a Nazi like situation and
they knew how excellent and relevant our principles are to the issue,
it could help our readership.

Some books or booklets have a book description included on the cover
and we may like to include some angle on tithing with our description
to help people understand that this is the topic they would be looking
for.

We have from time to time fielded questions about how Buddhist
Principles could be used to better respond or proactively prevent such
and such historical concerns.

Since the Nazis and WWII are a big historical concern including with
America and Europe we have responded to a number.

During our study about the Netherlands Water Restraining Systems we
also happened to read about how the delivery of food to Europe helped
the people there who were being neglected by the Nazis.

Of course this fits in with maintaining the shrines at home and
abroad(Principle 6) not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made
and given before and are general Buddhist practice of generosity.(Cago
as referred to in the Third Noble Truth which continues to be of
inspiration today as it was in the time of Lord Buddha Vipassi.
Panga7

Posts: 276
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:32 am

We are a world leader in knowing about the spiritual roots about the
decline of the weather in the United States in the past 10 years and
we can take advantage of this with our booklet that we are the
knowledge source about the problem, the cause of the problem, the
improvement about the decline, and the way to get the improvement
about the decline.


We have been getting some extreme weather in the United States in the
past 10 years.

We know why that is and we founded the Principle 7 Subforum with the
Weather and Relief Subforum to help arouse peoples mindfulness about
this concerning issue.

Now we have started to see more of a similar concern in Asia for the
same reason and we are called upon to keep developing more and more
ways of arousing people's mindfulness about the issue since we know
why.

Since we have superior knowledge as to the issue let us also take a
"bigger piece of the pie" with regards to Principle 7 services since
we are the ones who know best about the reason for the increase in the
weather concerns and let us benefit from our experience serving in
America to more quickly address the issue in Asia prior to it becoming
as extreme as the situation was in the United States then.
Panga7

Posts: 276
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 12:18 pm

Sainthood Forum has demonstrated the relevant World Foresight knowing
about the spiritual roots of the Weather Problems in the United States
and providing online advisement to Asia about the importance of
Classical Buddhist Practice in the tradition of Samma Sambuddha Gotama
with anticipation of the same concerns.

Invest in the future with the 7 Buddhist Principles for Success and
the unsurpassed Teaching of Buddha Gotama. Buddha Gotama has attained
the deathless and we have demonstrated the advantage of our
understanding of his teaching.
Panga7

Posts: 276
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:50 am

Questions we have been getting about the 7 Principles for Success.

including

How can we develope the 7 Principles for Success to help about weather concerns?

How can we provide proper guard ward and protection according to the
dhamma for Arahants so that such Arahants may come in the future to
abide there and those already there may abide in comfort if we are not
sure whether someone is an Arahant or not?
Panga7

Posts: 276
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:00 pm

The duties of a Dharmaraja from Long Discourse # 26

A Dharmaraja provides proper guard, ward and protection according to
the dhamma for his Khattiya vassals attending on him, for Brahmins and
householders, town and country folk(those staying in urban areas and
those staying in rural or forest areas), ascetics and Brahmins, beast
and bird. He allows no evil to succeed in the country. He gives
property to the needy. From time to time he goes to wise ascetics and
Brahmins, each one calming himself, each one taming himself and asks
questions such as: What is the wholesome? What is the unwholesome?
What is blameworthy? What is blameless? What course should be
followed? What course should not be followed? What if I do it will
lead to my happiness for a long time? What if I do it will lead to my
suffering for a long time?

These are the duties of a Dharmaraja.


Since Principle 6 for preventing decline is maintaining the shrines at
home and abroad not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made and
given before and one can see how this fits in with the giving property
to the needy duty of a Dharmaraja one can be diligient about monks and
nuns, male and female samaneras even if one is not sure about who is
an Arahant and who has not attained Arahantship yet.
Panga7

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Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:10 pm

Panga7 wrote:
The duties of a Dharmaraja from Long Discourse # 26

A Dharmaraja provides proper guard, ward and protection according to
the dhamma for his Khattiya vassals attending on him, for Brahmins and
householders, town and country folk(those staying in urban areas and
those staying in rural or forest areas), ascetics and Brahmins, beast
and bird. He allows no evil to succeed in the country. He gives
property to the needy. From time to time he goes to wise ascetics and
Brahmins, each one calming himself, each one taming himself and asks
questions such as: What is the wholesome? What is the unwholesome?
What is blameworthy? What is blameless? What course should be
followed? What course should not be followed? What if I do it will
lead to my happiness for a long time? What if I do it will lead to my
suffering for a long time?

These are the duties of a Dharmaraja.


Since Principle 6 for preventing decline is maintaining the shrines at
home and abroad not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made and
given before and one can see how this fits in with the giving property
to the needy duty of a Dharmaraja one can be diligient about monks and
nuns, male and female samaneras even if one is not sure about who is
an Arahant and who has not attained Arahantship yet.


What happened in the United States in the past some 10 years plus now
is some people were very negligient and then very naughty to an
Arahant monk and then there were many more weather type disasters and
these types of things.

We have seen the same types of concerns in Asia because of the same
reason, but we are hoping because of Asia's traditional respect for
Buddhism that will enable us to warn them. Furthermore warning about
the public endangerment that such naughty behavior would cause in
general may help us to place stopping such naughty behavior and such
slander, perjury, and public endangerment that would attempt to
accompany such naughty behavior.

So the same basic principles apply and in the case of slander,
perjury, and public endangerment we are obliged to scrutinize the
facts furthermore to save lives, and not act wrongly in response to
false allegations or claims, and not to allow corrupt people to
oppress and harass Arahant monastics while attempting to deliberately
deceive the public about the truth.

So the fact finding procedures should be pressed to hire and otappi
the naughty corrupt people so that they will be afraid to endanger the
public, and don't let them deprive people of liberty without due
process, nor under false claims that due process was followed when in
fact what they are doing is ridiculous nonsense and deliberate
criminal conspiracy.
Panga7

Posts: 276
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:32 pm

Another thing we have gotten a very positive and interested response
from in general is cago, generosity with the third Noble Truth.

We have applied this including with our philanthropy work and it makes
a great deal of sense to us and apparently to many of our followers
because we have gotten a big response.

So cago is certainly very relevant to the 7 Principles for Success and
therefore another angle for inclusion with our booklet.

Buddha has referred to his knowledge of the 12 ways, the 3 modes of
penetration to the 4 Noble Truths being completely purified and we can
use this to help clarify how the Buddhist practise in general helps to
fulfill the factors of the 7 factors of enlightenment.
Panga7

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Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:21 pm
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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:57 pm

Buddha also includes with his talk to the monks then in Section 1 from
Long Discourse #16, a number of principles for the monks to prevent
decline.

Our booklet about the Principles for preventing decline may be an
appropriate context to also consider these things taught to the monks.

Additionally Buddha includes 6 Memorable Qualities which are revelant
to our considerations with the booklet and our including here with the
quote from LD#16.


6. Then, soon after Vassakara's departure, the Blessed One addressed
the Venerable Ananda thus: "Go now, Ananda, and assemble in the hall
of audience as many bhikkhus as live around Rajagaha."

"Very well, Lord." And the Venerable Ananda did as he was requested
and informed the Blessed One: "The community of bhikkhus is assembled,
Lord. Now let the Blessed One do as he wishes."

Thereupon the Blessed One rose from his seat, went up to the hall of
audience, took his appointed seat there, and addressed the bhikkhus
thus: "Seven conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they assemble frequently and in large numbers;
meet and disperse peacefully and attend to the affairs of the Sangha
in concord; so long as they appoint no new rules, and do not abolish
the existing ones, but proceed in accordance with the code of training
(Vinaya) laid down; so long as they show respect, honor, esteem, and
veneration towards the elder bhikkhus, those of long standing, long
gone forth, the fathers and leaders of the Sangha, and think it
worthwhile to listen to them; so long as they do not come under the
power of the craving that leads to fresh becoming; so long as they
cherish the forest depths for their dwellings; so long as they
establish themselves in mindfulness, so that virtuous brethren of the
Order who have not come yet might do so, and those already come might
live in peace; so long, bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to
welfare endure among the bhikkhus and the bhikkhus are known for it,
their growth is to be expected, not their decline.

7. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they do not delight in, are not pleased with, and
are not fond of activities, talk, sleep, and company; so long as they
do not harbor, do not come under the spell of evil desires; have no
bad friends, associates, or companions; and so long as they do not
stop halfway on account of some trifling achievement. So long,
bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among
the bhikkhus and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Seven Good Qualities [6]

8. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they shall have faith, so long as they have moral
shame and fear of misconduct, are proficient in learning, resolute,
mindful, and wise. So long, bhikkhus, as these seven conditions
leading to welfare endure among the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are
known for it, their growth is to be expected, not their decline.
Seven Factors of Enlightenment [7]

9. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they cultivate the seven factors of
enlightenment, that is: mindfulness, investigation into phenomena,
energy, bliss, tranquillity, concentration, and equanimity. So long,
bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among
the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Seven Perceptions

10. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they cultivate the perception of impermanence, of
egolessness, of (the body's) impurity, of (the body's) wretchedness,
of relinquishment, of dispassion, and of cessation. So long, bhikkhus,
as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among the
bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Six Conditions to be Remembered [8]

11. "Six further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they attend on each other with loving-kindness in
deed, word, and thought, both openly and in private; so long as in
respect of what they receive as due offerings, even the contents of
their alms bowls, they do not make use of them without sharing them
with virtuous members of the community; so long as, in company with
their brethren, they train themselves, openly and in private, in the
rules of conduct, which are complete and perfect, spotless and pure,
liberating, praised by the wise, uninfluenced (by mundane concerns),
and favorable to concentration of mind; and in company with their
brethren, preserve, openly and in private, the insight that is noble
and liberating, and leads one who acts upon it to the utter
destruction of suffering. So long, bhikkhus, as these six conditions
leading to welfare endure among the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are
known for it, their growth is to be expected, not their decline.
Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet
by Panga7 on Mon Dec 05, 2011 1:23 pm

More selections from Vajjian Vagga, Vajjian Chapter, from Sattaka
Nipata, Section of the 7's, Anguttara Nikaya, Numerical Discourses of
the Buddha, also translated by Pali Text Society in full with title
Gradual Sayings.

7:26 (Pali Text numbering system)

Monks, these 7 things lead to decline of a monk when training. What 7?

Delight in action("action"), delight in talk, delight in sleeping,
delight in company, unguardedness of the sense-doors, no moderation in
eating, and when there is business of the Order(some task that should
be done for the Sangha) a monk undergoing the training does not
reflect, "There are in the Order elders of experience, long gone
forth, of long standing, the fathers and leaders of the Sangha. They
will be known for that, but makes an effort on his own account.

Verily monks, these are the 7...(and the opposite holds for principle
for preventing decline of a monk in training.)

7:27 Decline

These 7 things lead to a lay disciple's decline. What 7?

He fails to see the monks, neglects to hear Sadhamma, trains not in
more virtue(adhisila), puts little trust in elder monks(monks worthy
of trust), novice, or middle standing, with critical mind seeking
faults, hears Dhamma, seeks a gift worthy outside the Order and their
first serves.

Verily monks, these 7 things lead to a lay-disciple's decline.(And the
opposite holds for 7 principles of non-decline)

Who fails to see the man in whom the self is made become, nor Ariyan
Dhamma hears,
Nor in more virtue trains, whose trust in monks
Groweth not more and more, who fain would listen
With carping mind to Saddhama, who seeks
Outside some gift worthy and even there
As lay-disciple his first service doing
These 7 well taught things that causes decline
Who practices in Saddhamma declines.

Who never fails to see self cultured men,
Hears Ariyan Dhamma, in more virtue(adhisila) trains,
Whose trust in monks grows ever more and more
Who listens not to Saddhamma carpingly,
Nor seeks outside one gift worthy, but those
Within as lay disciple firstly serves;
These 7 taught things that never cause decline,
Who follows in Saddhamma ne'r(does not) decline.

(28-30) Unprofitable, backsliding. "Monks these 7 things are
unprofitable...these 7 are profitable...these 7 things are
backsliding...these 7 are progress. What 7? ( Reply as in 27)

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The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya Empty Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success by Buddha Viriya

Post  Admin on Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:13 am

The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:13 am
We are in the process of putting together a booklet about the 7
Principles for Success taught by the Buddha to help better explain to
people in various ways about the importance of the 7 Principles for
Success and why they need them to stop such and such types of decline.
We have also started a topic in the Buddhist images section.

This type of work has been marked as a high priority with our service
and our members may consider additonal ways of explaining to people
about the importance of these and various ways of implementation of
these practices in society.

Section from beginning of Long Discourse 16 published by Wisdom
Publications Full Translation Long Discourses of the Buddha previously
published as paperback titled Thus Have I Heard and the same section
which may also be found in the Section of the 7s Vajjian Chapter,
Numerical Discourses of the Buddha, full translation published by Pali
Text Society with title, The Book of the Gradual Sayings



4. At that time the Venerable Ananda [4] was standing behind the
Blessed One, fanning him, and the Blessed One addressed the Venerable
Ananda thus: "What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis have frequent
gatherings, and are their meetings well attended?"

"I have heard, Lord, that this is so."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis assemble and disperse
peacefully and attend to their affairs in concord?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis neither enact new decrees
nor abolish existing ones, but proceed in accordance with their
ancient constitutions?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis show respect, honor,
esteem, and veneration towards their elders and think it worthwhile to
listen to them?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis refrain from abducting
women and maidens of good families and from detaining them?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they refrain from doing so."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis show respect, honor,
esteem, and veneration towards their shrines, both those within the
city and those outside it, and do not deprive them of the due
offerings as given and made to them formerly?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do venerate their shrines, and that
they do not deprive them of their offerings."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline.

"What have you heard, Ananda: do the Vajjis duly protect and guard the
arahats, so that those who have not come to the realm yet might do so,
and those who have already come might live there in peace?"

"I have heard, Lord, that they do."

"So long, Ananda, as this is the case, the growth of the Vajjis is to
be expected, not their decline."

5. And the Blessed One addressed the brahman Vassakara in these words:
"Once, brahman, I dwelt at Vesali, at the Sarandada shrine, and there
it was that I taught the Vajjis these seven conditions leading to (a
nation's) welfare. [5] So long, brahman, as these endure among the
Vajjis, and the Vajjis are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline."

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:27 am
Tithing has continued to be popular and influencial practice in the
world dating back in the Christian Religion to the Book of Daniel and
beyond.

These concerns continue to be relevant today and it has been suggested
that we capitalize on people's vested interest in preventing decline
in our booklet, including with topics such as Operation Mana Conquers
the Nazis.

If people were facing and/or concerned about a Nazi like situation and
they knew how excellent and relevant our principles are to the issue,
it could help our readership.

Some books or booklets have a book description included on the cover
and we may like to include some angle on tithing with our description
to help people understand that this is the topic they would be looking
for.

We have from time to time fielded questions about how Buddhist
Principles could be used to better respond or proactively prevent such
and such historical concerns.

Since the Nazis and WWII are a big historical concern including
with America and Europe we have responded to a number.

During our study about the Netherlands Water Restraining Systems
we also happened to read about how the delivery of food to Europe
helped the people there who were being neglected by the Nazis.

Of course this fits in with maintaining the shrines at home and
abroad(Principle 6) not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made
and given before and are general Buddhist practice of generosity.(Cago
as referred to in the Third Noble Truth which continues to be of
inspiration today as it was in the time of Lord Buddha Vipassi.

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:32 am
We are a world leader in knowing about the spiritual roots about the
decline of the weather in the United States in the past 10 years and
we can take advantage of this with our booklet that we are the
knowledge source about the problem, the cause of the problem, the
improvement about the decline, and the way to get the improvement
about the decline.


We have been getting some extreme weather in the United States in
the past 10 years.

We know why that is and we founded the Principle 7 Subforum with
the Weather and Relief Subforum to help arouse peoples mindfulness
about this concerning issue.

Now we have started to see more of a similar concern in Asia for
the same reason and we are called upon to keep developing more and
more ways of arousing people's mindfulness about the issue since we
know why.

Since we have superior knowledge as to the issue let us also take
a "bigger piece of the pie" with regards to Principle 7 services since
we are the ones who know best about the reason for the increase in the
weather concerns and let us benefit from our experience serving in
America to more quickly address the issue in Asia prior to it becoming
as extreme as the situation was in the United States then.

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Thu Nov 24, 2011 12:18 pm
Sainthood Forum has demonstrated the relevant World Foresight knowing
about the spiritual roots of the Weather Problems in the United States
and providing online advisement to Asia about the importance of
Classical Buddhist Practice in the tradition of Samma Sambuddha Gotama
with anticipation of the same concerns.

Invest in the future with the 7 Buddhist Principles for Success and
the unsurpassed Teaching of Buddha Gotama. Buddha Gotama has attained
the deathless and we have demonstrated the advantage of our
understanding of his teaching.

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:50 am
Questions we have been getting about the 7 Principles for Success.

including

How can we develope the 7 Principles for Success to help about weather concerns?

How can we provide proper guard ward and protection according to the
dhamma for Arahants so that such Arahants may come in the future to
abide there and those already there may abide in comfort if we are not
sure whether someone is an Arahant or not?

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:00 pm
The duties of a Dharmaraja from Long Discourse # 26

A Dharmaraja provides proper guard, ward and protection according
to the dhamma for his Khattiya vassals attending on him, for Brahmins
and householders, town and country folk(those staying in urban areas
and those staying in rural or forest areas), ascetics and Brahmins,
beast and bird. He allows no evil to succeed in the country. He gives
property to the needy. From time to time he goes to wise ascetics and
Brahmins, each one calming himself, each one taming himself and asks
questions such as: What is the wholesome? What is the unwholesome?
What is blameworthy? What is blameless? What course should be
followed? What course should not be followed? What if I do it will
lead to my happiness for a long time? What if I do it will lead to my
suffering for a long time?

These are the duties of a Dharmaraja.



Since Principle 6 for preventing decline is maintaining the shrines at
home and abroad not withdrawing the proper tithe and support made and
given before and one can see how this fits in with the giving property
to the needy duty of a Dharmaraja one can be diligient about monks and
nuns, male and female samaneras even if one is not sure about who is
an Arahant and who has not attained Arahantship yet.

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:10 pm

Panga7 wrote:The duties of a Dharmaraja from Long Discourse # 26

A Dharmaraja provides proper guard, ward and protection
according to the dhamma for his Khattiya vassals attending on him, for
Brahmins and householders, town and country folk(those staying in
urban areas and those staying in rural or forest areas), ascetics and
Brahmins, beast and bird. He allows no evil to succeed in the country.
He gives property to the needy. From time to time he goes to wise
ascetics and Brahmins, each one calming himself, each one taming
himself and asks questions such as: What is the wholesome? What is the
unwholesome? What is blameworthy? What is blameless? What course
should be followed? What course should not be followed? What if I do
it will lead to my happiness for a long time? What if I do it will
lead to my suffering for a long time?

These are the duties of a Dharmaraja.



Since Principle 6 for preventing decline is maintaining the
shrines at home and abroad not withdrawing the proper tithe and
support made and given before and one can see how this fits in with
the giving property to the needy duty of a Dharmaraja one can be
diligient about monks and nuns, male and female samaneras even if one
is not sure about who is an Arahant and who has not attained
Arahantship yet.



What happened in the United States in the past some 10 years plus now
is some people were very negligient and then very naughty to an
Arahant monk and then there were many more weather type disasters and
these types of things.

We have seen the same types of concerns in Asia because of the same
reason, but we are hoping because of Asia's traditional respect for
Buddhism that will enable us to warn them. Furthermore warning about
the public endangerment that such naughty behavior would cause in
general may help us to place stopping such naughty behavior and such
slander, perjury, and public endangerment that would attempt to
accompany such naughty behavior.

So the same basic principles apply and in the case of slander,
perjury, and public endangerment we are obliged to scrutinize the
facts furthermore to save lives, and not act wrongly in response to
false allegations or claims, and not to allow corrupt people to
oppress and harass Arahant monastics while attempting to deliberately
deceive the public about the truth.

So the fact finding procedures should be pressed to hire and otappi
the naughty corrupt people so that they will be afraid to endanger the
public, and don't let them deprive people of liberty without due
process, nor under false claims that due process was followed when in
fact what they are doing is ridiculous nonsense and deliberate
criminal conspiracy.

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:32 pm
Another thing we have gotten a very positive and interested response
from in general is cago, generosity with the third Noble Truth.

We have applied this including with our philanthropy work and it makes
a great deal of sense to us and apparently to many of our followers
because we have gotten a big response.

So cago is certainly very relevant to the 7 Principles for Success and
therefore another angle for inclusion with our booklet.

Buddha has referred to his knowledge of the 12 ways, the 3 modes of
penetration to the 4 Noble Truths being completely purified and we can
use this to help clarify how the Buddhist practise in general helps to
fulfill the factors of the 7 factors of enlightenment.

Panga7

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Re: The Importance of the 7 Principles for Success Booklet

Postby Panga7 on Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:57 pm
Buddha also includes with his talk to the monks then in Section 1 from
Long Discourse #16, a number of principles for the monks to prevent
decline.

Our booklet about the Principles for preventing decline may be an
appropriate context to also consider these things taught to the monks.

Additionally Buddha includes 6 Memorable Qualities which are revelant
to our considerations with the booklet and our including here with the
quote from LD#16.


6. Then, soon after Vassakara's departure, the Blessed One
addressed the Venerable Ananda thus: "Go now, Ananda, and assemble in
the hall of audience as many bhikkhus as live around Rajagaha."

"Very well, Lord." And the Venerable Ananda did as he was
requested and informed the Blessed One: "The community of bhikkhus is
assembled, Lord. Now let the Blessed One do as he wishes."

Thereupon the Blessed One rose from his seat, went up to the hall
of audience, took his appointed seat there, and addressed the bhikkhus
thus: "Seven conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they assemble frequently and in large numbers;
meet and disperse peacefully and attend to the affairs of the Sangha
in concord; so long as they appoint no new rules, and do not abolish
the existing ones, but proceed in accordance with the code of training
(Vinaya) laid down; so long as they show respect, honor, esteem, and
veneration towards the elder bhikkhus, those of long standing, long
gone forth, the fathers and leaders of the Sangha, and think it
worthwhile to listen to them; so long as they do not come under the
power of the craving that leads to fresh becoming; so long as they
cherish the forest depths for their dwellings; so long as they
establish themselves in mindfulness, so that virtuous brethren of the
Order who have not come yet might do so, and those already come might
live in peace; so long, bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to
welfare endure among the bhikkhus and the bhikkhus are known for it,
their growth is to be expected, not their decline.

7. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they do not delight in, are not pleased with, and
are not fond of activities, talk, sleep, and company; so long as they
do not harbor, do not come under the spell of evil desires; have no
bad friends, associates, or companions; and so long as they do not
stop halfway on account of some trifling achievement. So long,
bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among
the bhikkhus and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Seven Good Qualities [6]

8. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they shall have faith, so long as they have moral
shame and fear of misconduct, are proficient in learning, resolute,
mindful, and wise. So long, bhikkhus, as these seven conditions
leading to welfare endure among the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are
known for it, their growth is to be expected, not their decline.
Seven Factors of Enlightenment [7]

9. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they cultivate the seven factors of
enlightenment, that is: mindfulness, investigation into phenomena,
energy, bliss, tranquillity, concentration, and equanimity. So long,
bhikkhus, as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among
the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Seven Perceptions

10. "Seven further conditions leading to welfare I shall set
forth, bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they cultivate the perception of impermanence, of
egolessness, of (the body's) impurity, of (the body's) wretchedness,
of relinquishment, of dispassion, and of cessation. So long, bhikkhus,
as these seven conditions leading to welfare endure among the
bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are known for it, their growth is to be
expected, not their decline.
Six Conditions to be Remembered [8]

11. "Six further conditions leading to welfare I shall set forth,
bhikkhus. Listen and pay heed to what I shall say."

"So be it, Lord."

"The growth of the bhikkhus is to be expected, not their decline,
bhikkhus, so long as they attend on each other with loving-kindness in
deed, word, and thought, both openly and in private; so long as in
respect of what they receive as due offerings, even the contents of
their alms bowls, they do not make use of them without sharing them
with virtuous members of the community; so long as, in company with
their brethren, they train themselves, openly and in private, in the
rules of conduct, which are complete and perfect, spotless and pure,
liberating, praised by the wise, uninfluenced (by mundane concerns),
and favorable to concentration of mind; and in company with their
brethren, preserve, openly and in private, the insight that is noble
and liberating, and leads one who acts upon it to the utter
destruction of suffering. So long, bhikkhus, as these six conditions
leading to welfare endure among the bhikkhus, and the bhikkhus are
known for it, their growth is to be expected, not their decline.

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