Typhoon Haiyan Historical Proportion

Go down

Typhoon Haiyan Historical Proportion

Post  Raymond_Smith on Tue Nov 12, 2013 2:31 pm

Remember the urgency of clean drinking water in a relief scenario.

Remember the use of flotation devices of things that float with the Cajun Navy in the Katrina Scenario.


More misery as tropical storm hits Philippines

The Philippine city of Tacloban is ground zero in an area wiped out by fast-moving, ferocious Typhoon Haiyan. People are desperate for aid and have no access to food, shelter or water. NBC's Harry Smith reports.
By Nancy Snyderman, Harry Smith and F. Brinley Bruton, NBC News
TACLOBAN, Philippines — Thousands of survivors on Tuesday swarmed the airport in the province hardest hit by Typhoon Haiyan, trying to flee the country as another heavy tropical weather system made landfall in the Philippines.
Only a few hundred people were able to make it out — leaving behind a shattered, rain-lashed city short of food and water and littered with countless bodies.
Tacloban, a city of 200,000 people on the island of Leyte, lay in ruins, with bodies littering the streets. A civil defense official told NBC News on Monday that more than 56,000 homes had been destroyed on the island of Panay, with 83,000 others damaged.
Assistance was only just beginning to arrive for the victims. The national disaster agency said Tuesday morning that it had confirmed 1,774 deaths, with 2,784 other people confirmed injured, but authorities aid workers and emergency officials warned that there had been no contact with many hard-hit areas, and they estimated that when the final tally is known, 10,000 or more will have died.
The city was in the grip of a health crisis. There wasn't enough clean water, and cases of dysentery were reported. The city was without electricity and facing severe water and food shortages. Survivors stumbled among the shells of shattered buildings and splintered trees, passing by numerous bodies covered in red tarps.
Even as aid workers and emergency officials struggled to make their first contact with many typhoon-hit parts of the country after more than three days, a new tropical depression called Zoraida made landfall about 11 a.m. (10 p.m. Monday ET), in the southeastern province of Mindanao, the national weather agency reported.
Although Zoraida was only a tropical depression carrying maximum sustained winds of 35 mph, it was moving northwest — directly over the devastated island chain — at only 18 mph, much more slowly than Haiyan, and it wasn't expected to leave Philippine territory until Thursday morning.

Nelson Salting / AP
Authorities estimated that one of the most powerful storms ever recorded killed at least 10,000 people in the central Philippines, with huge waves sweeping away entire coastal villages and devastating the region's main city.

"What worries us is there are so many areas that we have no information from, and when we have this silence this usually means that the damage is even worse," Joseph Curry, country representative for Catholic Relief Services, told TODAY.
"We're unable to know the full extent of how many people are isolated and unreached. I would say it's in the millions," said Julien Anseau, an Asia region communications manager with ChildFund International.
The storm is estimated to have destroyed up to 80 percent of buildings in its path in the provinces of Samar and Leyte.

As survivors assess the damage, Joseph Curry of Catholic Relief Services says victims are in desperate need of help rebuilding their homes.
President Benigno Aquino declared a State of National Calamity on Monday and said 1.1 billion pesos (more than $83 million) had been approved by the government for victim relief.
Haiyan leveled Basey, a seaside town about six miles across a bay from Tacloban. Guiuan, a town in eastern Samar province with a population of 40,000, was also largely destroyed.
A World Vision official said early reports suggested that as much as 90 percent of northern Cebu had been destroyed. An aid team from Oxfam reported "utter destruction" in the northern-most tip of Cebu, the charity said.
The region's infrastructure was destroyed by giant waves and winds of up to 235 mph when the storm slammed into central Philippines on Friday, which made bringing aid to hardest-hit communities almost impossible.
The military was deployed after reports of looting. Aquino said 800 soldiers were deployed to Tacloban to "restore peace and order."
Residents of Tacloban were relying almost entirely on three military transport planes flying from nearby Cebu city for supplies and evacuation.

Some of Typhoon Haiyan's survivors are frustrated by what they deem an anemic response to the storm. NBC's Dr. Nancy Snyderman reports.
Even water from Tacloban's normally reliable pumps had been compromised, and few people appeared to be boiling water as officials suggested. Many people said that they were thirsty and that there was little access to aid.
"Help us! Help us! Where is President Aquino? We need water! We are very thirsty!" a woman shouted as she stood among dozens of other residents at the airport gates in Tacloban. "When are you going to get bodies from the streets?"
Mobs attacked trucks loaded with food, tents and water on Tanauan bridge in Leyte, Philippines Red Cross Chairman Richard Gordon said.
There were reports of a mass grave with up to 500 bodies in Tacloban, according to Reuters.
"It is so difficult. It is like we are starting again," Awelina Hadloc, the owner of a convenience store in Tacloban, told Reuters as she foraged for instant noodles at a warehouse that was almost bare. "There are no more supplies in the warehouse and the malls."

The storm may be the most violent to ever make landfall. Power is out, and both water and food are in short supply. NBC's Angus Walker reports.
Residents of Tacloban told terrifying accounts of being swept away by a wall of water. Jean Mae Amande, 22, said she was washed several miles from her home by the surge of water. The current ripped her out to sea before pushing her back to shore, where she was able to cling to a tree and grab a rope thrown from a boat.
"It's a miracle that the ship was there," Amande said.
Weather forecasters said they believed this was the strongest storm ever to hit land.
"There have been more powerful storms over the sea, but this could be the strongest ever to hit land," said Kevin North, a lead meteorologist with the Weather Channel.

On Sunday, U.S. officials dispatched a team of 90 Marines and sailors — the first wave of U.S. military help — to the Philippines to assist with search and rescue operations and provide air support.
The U.S. Agency for International Development is also sending emergency shelter and hygiene materials expected to arrive early this week. The agency announced that the U.S. government is providing $20 million to affected areas to help with "emergency shelter, food, relief commodities, water and sanitation."
Ten million dollars of that is being used by USAID's Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) to "support immediate response efforts, including procuring, transporting, and distributing emergency relief commodities and improving access to sanitation facilities for typhoon-affected populations," officials said in a statement.
The Pentagon announced Monday that Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel has ordered the aircraft carrier USS George Washington and other Navy ships to make best speed for the Philippines.
The aircraft carrier, which holds 5,000 sailors and more than 80 aircraft, is in Hong Kong for a port visit. The crew is being recalled early from shore leave, and the ship is expected to be underway later Monday evening.
British Prime Minister David Cameron said Monday that Britain has also deployed a navy warship with equipment to purify seawater into drinking water and 200 military personnel on board.
Justine Greening, Britain's secretary for overseas development, said Britain has also pledged a total of 10 million pounds (about $16 million) to relief efforts.
NBC News' M. Alex Johnson, F. Brinley Bruton, Elisha Fieldstadt and Henry Austin, Reuters and The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Vietnam escapes worst of Typhoon Haiyan
Houses damaged and several people missing after storm that left thousands dead in the Philippines makes landfall.
Last updated: 11 Nov 2013 14:17
Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker
Email Article

Print Article

Share article

Send Feedback
The storm caused some damage but no casualties were reported [AFP]
Typhoon Haiyan has made landfall in Vietnam, days after leaving thousands feared dead and widespread devastation in the Philippines, meteorologists confirm.

The national weather forecaster said Haiyan made landfall in northern province of Quang Ninh at 5:00am local time on Monday (22:00 GMT on Sunday) as a tropical storm. It was moving towards southern China and is expected to weaken to a low depression later on Monday.

 
Downpours hit the capital, Hanoi, and houses in some northern provinces were damaged by strong winds.

"Several hundred houses had their roofs ripped off. Thousands of trees in the province were uprooted," said Nguyen Cong Thuan, a disaster official in Quang Ninh province.

"Three people were reported missing," he added.

National disaster officials said no deaths had been reported so far on Monday, although state media said five people had died during preparations for the typhoon.

Thousands evacuated

Haiyan has weakened significantly since scything through the Philippines at the weekend, and had sustained winds of 120km per hour as it hit Vietnam. That was down from winds of over 300km per hour when the storm hit the Philippines, devastating Leyte and Samar provinces, as well as other areas.

More than 600,000 Vietnamese were evacuated from their homes at the weekend as Haiyan bore down on Vietnam.

The storm changed course on Sunday, prompting further mass evacuations of about 52,000 people in northern provinces by the coast.

"People must bring enough food and necessities for three days.... Those who do not move voluntarily will be forced," online newspaper VNExpress said, adding all boats have been ordered back to shore.

All schools were ordered shut in the capital Monday and extra police were dispatched to redirect traffic in flood-prone areas.
Stories topic with inspiring utube links to help the situation.

http://7gems.forumotion.com/t58-inspiring-songs-flood-help-scenario#157

Clean Water for Navy Bean Soup

The aircraft carrier USS George Washington and a contingent of seven supply ships began delivering water and emergency rations to Tacloban.  The giant hospital ship USS Mercy is making emergency preparations to depart the United States and is expected to join the emergency flotilla within weeks, along with the British carrier HMS Illustrious.

As U.S. helicopters sped food and water to the city, reconnaissance aircraft began charting the worst-hit areas.



A MH-60S helicopter, from the “Island Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25, from the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Charles Drew (T AKE 10), transports a pallet of water en route to the Republic of the Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.
A MH-60S helicopter, from the “Island Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25, from the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Charles Drew (T AKE 10), transports a pallet of water en route to the Republic of the Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.
Brian Goldbeck, the Deputy Chief of Mission for the U.S. Embassy in Manila, said he beleives the aid distrubution is going well so far.

"I think the key point here is that a large volume of assistance was pushed through to Tacloban. Now what's happening, is that the MV-22s, the Ospreys, together with the helicopters from [the] George Washington carrier strike group, together with the Philippines' own helicopters; all of those assets are now moving resources from Tacloban to multiple points, I think 16 or 18 different drop points, yesterday and today," said Goldbeck.

The flow of relief supplies has been hampered by wrecked roadways and a lack of gasoline in and near the city. Officials say the fuel shortages have been made worse by retail merchants who are afraid to sell their gasoline supplies for fear of rioting by an increasingly desperate population.

Caught off guard

President Benigno Aquino, caught off guard by the scale of the disaster, has been criticized for the slow pace of aid distribution and unclear estimates of casualties, especially in Tacloban, capital of hardest-hit Leyte province.

The level of confusion over casualties was made plain when a notice board in Tacloban City Hall estimated the deaths at 4,000 on Friday, up from 2,000 a day before, in that town alone. Hours later, Tacloban mayor Alfred Romualdez apologized and said the toll was only an estimate, and for the whole of the central Philippines, not just Tacloban.

The toll, marked up on a whiteboard, is compiled by officials who started burying bodies in a mass grave on Thursday.

Romualdez said some people may have been swept out to sea and their bodies lost after a tsunami-like wall of seawater slammed into coastal areas. One neighborhood with a population of between 10,000 and 12,000 was now deserted, he said.

The City Hall toll was the first public acknowledgement that the number of fatalities would likely far exceed an estimate given this week by Aquino, who said the loss of life from Typhoon Haiyan would be closer to 2,000 or 2,500.


Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan walk amid ruins of their homes in Maraboth, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.
◀▶<▶>1/9⇱ Disable Captions
Death toll under review

Adding to the confusion, the United Nations, citing government figures, put the latest overall death toll at 4,460, but a spokeswoman said it was now reviewing the figure.

On Tuesday, Aquino said estimates of 10,000 dead by local officials were overstated and caused by “emotional trauma”. Elmer Soria, a regional police chief who made that estimate to media, was removed from his post on Thursday.

Stunned survivors in Tacloban said the toll could be many thousands. “There are a lot of dead people on the street in our neighborhood, by the trash,” said Aiza Umpacan, a 27-year-old resident of San Jose, one of the worst-hit neighborhoods.

“There are still a lot of streets that were not visited by the disaster relief operations. They are just going through the highways, not the inner streets,” he said. “The smell is getting worse and we actually have neighbors who have been brought to hospital because they are getting sick.”

The preliminary number of missing as of Friday, according to the Red Cross, rose to 25,000 from 22,000 a day earlier. That could include people who have since been located, it said.

Additional aid arrives

Meanwhile, a Norwegian merchant navy training vessel arrived at Tacloban on Friday with goods from the U.N. World Food Program, including 40 tons of rice, medical equipment and 6,200 body bags.

Boxes of aid were being unloaded at Tacloban's badly damaged airport, where more than a thousand people queued for hours hoping to evacuate. The tarmac was a hive of activity, with three large South Korean military transport planes joining two U.S. Osprey aircraft and U.S. Navy helicopters unloading and ferrying aid.

Hundreds of people, part of nearly a million who have been displaced by the storm, lined up for food and drink at an evacuee processing centre at Mactan Air Base in Cebu, the country's second-biggest city.

Some 522 evacuees passed through the centre on Thursday, with hundreds more arriving on Friday, a government coordinator, Erlinda Parame, said.

On Thursday, rescue personnel began the grim task of lowering unidentified bodies into a mass grave near Tacloban's city hall.

There were no official burial ceremonies, but a police photographer told the Associated Press that a portion of the femur was removed from each corpse. Technicians will later extract DNA from those remains to match with surviving next of kin.

United Nations humanitarian chief Valerie Amos, who toured Tacloban Wednesday, later called the situation "dismal". Despite it being monsoon season, tens of thousands of people are living in the open, exposed to wind and rain.
Over the past few days, I think all of us have been shaken by the images of the devastation wrought by Typhoon Haiyan.  It’s a heartbreaking reminder of how fragile life is, and among the dead are several Americans.  So our prayers are with the Filipino people, and with Filipino Americans across our country who are anxious about their family and friends back home.

One of our core principles is, when friends are in trouble, America helps.  As I told President Aquino earlier this week, the United States will continue to offer whatever assistance we can.  Our military personnel and USAID team do this better than anybody in the world, and they’ve been already on the ground working tirelessly to deliver food, water, medicine, shelter, and to help with airlift.  Today, the aircraft carrier USS George Washington and other ships arrived to help with search- and-rescue, as well as supplies, medical care and logistical support.  And more help is on the way.

America’s strength, of course, has always been more than just about what our government can do –- it’s also about what our citizens can do.  It’s about the big-heartedness of the American people when they see other folks in trouble.  So today, I would encourage everybody who wants to help, to visit WhiteHouse.gov/typhoon -- that's WhiteHouse.gov/typhoon -- and that will offer you links to organizations that are working on the ground and ways that you can support their efforts.  Our friends in the Philippines will face a long, hard road ahead, but they’ll continue to have a friend and partner in the United States of America.


A
id workers, heavy equipment and lifesaving supplies flowed into regions devastated by Typhoon Haiyan on Monday, as a global relief effort moved into high gear.

In this photo released by Malacanang Palace Photo Bureau in Manila, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, left in yellow shirt, inspects relief operations and the delivery of goods Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in the typhoon battered city of Tacloban, Leyte province in central Philippines. The trip was Aquino's second visit...
In this photo released by Malacanang Palace Photo Bureau in Manila, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, left in yellow shirt, inspects relief operations and the delivery of goods Sunday, Nov. 17,... (Associated Press)
Filipino military personnel assist an elderly individual in a wheel chair as typhoon survivors queue up to get onto an evacuation flight to leave the typhoon-ravaged city of Tacloban, in the Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were displaced by Typhoon Haiyan, which tore across several...
Filipino military personnel assist an elderly individual in a wheel chair as typhoon survivors queue up to get onto an evacuation flight to leave the typhoon-ravaged city of Tacloban, in the Philippines,... (Associated Press)
Philippine military personnel unload relief goods to be distributed to those affected by Typhoon Haiyan at the airport in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded, have only now begun to receive some aid, a week after their homes...
Philippine military personnel unload relief goods to be distributed to those affected by Typhoon Haiyan at the airport in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, one... (Associated Press)
Typhoon Haiyan survivors queue up to board a Philippine Air Force cargo plane running as an evacuation flight in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were displaced by Typhoon Haiyan, which tore across several islands in the eastern Philippines on Nov. 8. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Typhoon Haiyan survivors queue up to board a Philippine Air Force cargo plane running as an evacuation flight in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were displaced... (Associated Press)
A young Filipino takes a shower at a school turned into a temporary shelter for those affected by Typhoon Haiyan, in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were displaced by Typhoon Haiyan, which tore across several islands in the eastern Philippines on Nov. 8. (AP...
A young Filipino takes a shower at a school turned into a temporary shelter for those affected by Typhoon Haiyan, in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were... (Associated Press)
A Filipino man uses a shovel to clean up mud inside St. Joseph Parish church, which was badly damaged by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard Nov. 8, leaving a wide swath...
A Filipino man uses a shovel to clean up mud inside St. Joseph Parish church, which was badly damaged by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most... (Associated Press)
Typhoon Haiyan survivors queue up to get onto evacuation flights as seen from inside a tricycle at the airport in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were displaced by Typhoon Haiyan, which tore across several islands in the eastern Philippines on Nov. 8. (AP Photo/Dita...
Typhoon Haiyan survivors queue up to get onto evacuation flights as seen from inside a tricycle at the airport in Tacloban, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were displaced... (Associated Press)
(1 of 7) « Prev | Next » Slideshow
On the ground, there were further signs that battered communities were beginning to shift from survival mode to one of early recovery: markets were beginning to reopen, though with very limited wares, some gasoline stations were pumping and residents were repairing damaged homes or making temporary shelters out of the remains of their old ones.

"The darkest night is over but it's not yet 100 percent," regional military commander Lt. Gen. Roy Deveraturda said.

The Nov. 8 typhoon killed or left missing more than 5,000 people and left 4 million displaced, requiring food, shelter and water.

The first week of the response was inevitable chaotic because airports into the region were damaged and local governance structures shattered.

At the main airport in Tacloban, a pay loader was shifting pallets of water and sacks of rice to trucks. On the main road, teams were shifting debris into trucks.

Military and civilian teams from around the world have arrived to bolster an immediate response by local people and national authorities.

The U.S. government and military have been at the forefront in helping one of its Asian allies.

Washington's aid arm announced a further $10 million, bringing to $37 million the amount it is committed to spending.

"This will enable us to continue to move ahead with our help on things like the water system, on the logistics," said USAID assistant administrator Nancy Lindborg. "We have a steady drumbeat of supplies coming in and being distributed."

On Sunday, President Benigno Aquino III toured the disaster area and promised to step aid deliveries.

Aquino, seen as reformist president who had enjoyed considerable public support, has had to deal with a string of crises over the last year.

Raymond_Smith

Posts : 145
Join date : 2013-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Typhoon Haiyan Historical Proportion

Post  Raymond_Smith on Sun Nov 24, 2013 6:51 pm

Scenariio calling for significant help as expected.


Typhoon Haiyan: Death toll tops 5,200 two weeks after storm smashed Philippines

David Guttenfelder / AP
A firefighter stands near rows of Typhoon Haiyan victims in body bags on the roadside outside of Tacloban, Philippines, on Nov. 19.

By Alexander Smith, NBC News contributor
The death toll from super typhoon Haiyan, which smashed into the Philippines two weeks ago, has passed 5,200, an official said Friday.
The number of people killed by what was one of the most powerful storms ever to make landfall now stands at 5,209, Major Reynaldo Balido, spokesman for the Philippines National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), told NBC News.

Just days ago, she had the usual concerns of being 20 -- college studies and Facebook. After Typhoon Haiyan, Queennie Lucio focuses on helping her family find enough food, water, and maybe even hope, among the rubble.
He said more than 23,000 had been injured and 1,611 were still missing across islands devastated by Haiyan, which is known as Yolanda in the Philippines.
Asked how the relief effort was going, Balido said: “We have been doing better. We are starting to reach all the people in need, especially in Samar," referring to one of the worst affected islands.
“Right now we are on our third round of distributing relief," he added.
When asked if he expected the figures to rise, he said: “It’s hard to speculate if the death toll will increase significantly, but these figures include bodies from today.”
Interior Secretary Mar Roxas told the Associated Press: "That is the sad record of Yolanda's passage through our country," but he added that "the worst is over."
He likened the Philippines to a medical patient who had been taken out of the emergency room and transferred to intensive care.

Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
Villagers carry religious statues during a procession before Mass at a local chapel in Santa Rita township on Friday in Eastern Samar, Philippines.

"We have overcome the most difficult part," he said. "In the first week we can say we were in the emergency room ... this second week we are now in the ICU, still critical but stabilized."
Haiyan barreled into the Philippines on Nov. 8 with winds as high as 190 mph. It tore across the islands south of Manila, and the damage was severe even though 800,000 people were able to evacuate their homes.
The storm has damaged millions of dollars worth of crops and infrastructure, destroyed half-a-million homes, and affected more than 10 million people, according to an update posted later Friday by the NDRRMC.
Some 4.3 million people were said to have been displaced -- one million of whom were children.
The total cost of the damage is pegged at more than $288 million, according to the disaster agency. Around $112 million of this was damage to crops, and $100 million damage to livestock and fisheries.
The U.S. is just one of around two dozen governments who have sent aid to the Philippines.
A United Nations appeal for $301 million in relief aid has so far raised $131 million, according to an online tracker.

Raymond_Smith

Posts : 145
Join date : 2013-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Typhoon Haiyan Historical Proportion

Post  Raymond_Smith on Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:31 pm

Highlights According to the latest Government estimates, Typhoon Haiyan has resulted in over 5,200 deaths and nearly 26,000 injuries. Over 3.5 million people remain displaced from their homes, including 226,000 living in 1,068 evacuation centres. Preliminary results of a joint rapid assessment confirm that lifesaving needs persist in food, shelter, recovery of livelihoods and the restoration of essential community services in affected areas. Final results are expected on 27 November. Response efforts continue to expand, but greater planning is needed to ensure a smooth transition as some international partners – including foreign militaries and international health teams – prepare to leave. Local organizations in Cebu have established a working group to coordinate their activities and liaise with international partners. Participating local organizations often have better access to remote areas than international partners. - See more at: http://reliefweb.int/report/philippines/philippines-typhoon-haiyan-situation-report-no-18-27-november-2013#sthash.a2TOE4jJ.dpuf

Raymond_Smith

Posts : 145
Join date : 2013-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Typhoon Haiyan Historical Proportion

Post  Raymond_Smith on Tue Dec 10, 2013 3:47 pm

• Humanitarian partners presented on 10 December the Strategic Response Plan (SRP) for Typhoon Haiyan. The SRP requests US$791 million to complement the Government-led response and recovery efforts over the next 12 months. The Government will launch its Yolanda Recovery and Rehabilitation Plan (YRRP) on 18 December (amount to be confirmed).

• According to the latest Government (DSWD) estimates, Typhoon Haiyan affected about 14 million people, including 4 million people who remain displaced from their homes.

• To date, over 4.1 million affected people have received food assistance, including 1.15 million from partners other than WFP and DSWD. In addition, 144,629 shelter solutions have been distributed to affected people assisting in rebuilding damaged and destroyed houses. The availability of housing supplies remains patchy in affected areas.

• Migration Outflow Desks continue to monitor outflows from affected areas, with around 500 people reportedly leaving Guiuan daily. Monitoring mechanisms are required

Raymond_Smith

Posts : 145
Join date : 2013-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Typhoon Haiyan Historical Proportion

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum